acquired


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Related to acquired: acquired immunity, Acquired brain injury

ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd'),
Denoting a disease, predisposition or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired

/ac·quired/ (ah-kwīrd´) incurred as a result of factors acting from or originating outside the organism; not inherited.

acquired

(ə-kwīrd′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a disease, condition, or characteristic that is not congenital but develops after birth.
2. Resulting from exposure to something, such as an antigen or antibiotic.

acquired

[əkwī′ərd]
Etymology: L, acquirere, to obtain
pertaining to a characteristic, condition, or disease originating after birth, not caused by hereditary or developmental factors but by a reaction to environmental influences outside of the organism. An example is acquired immunity. Compare congenital, familial, hereditary.

acquired

adjective New; not inherited.

acquired

adjective New, not inherited

ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd')
Denoting a disease, condition, or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired

non-congenital

acquired 

Pertaining to a condition which is contracted after birth and is not hereditary. See congenital; familial; hereditary.

ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd')
Denoting a disease, predisposition or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired

incurred as a result of factors acting from or originating outside the organism; not inherited.

acquired bleeding
a tendency to bleed caused by factors other than inherited and congenital ones. Includes dicoumarol and warfarin poisonings, nutritional deficiency of vitamin K, liver disease and autoimmune thrombocytopenias.
feline acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
see feline immunodeficiency virus.
References in classic literature ?
But for the merit I have acquired in guiding thee upon the Way, there would have been added to me yet another life ere I had found my River.
I am foul-faced and a hillwoman, but, as thy talk goes, I have acquired merit.
The modern concierge's daughter who fulfils her ambition by playing the Queen of Spain in Ruy Blas at the Theatre Francais is only one of many thousands of men and women who have sloughed off their native dialects and acquired a new tongue.
SOCRATES: But if he always possessed this knowledge he would always have known; or if he has acquired the knowledge he could not have acquired it in this life, unless he has been taught geometry; for he may be made to do the same with all geometry and every other branch of knowledge.
In the first place, he is the son of a wealthy and wise father, Anthemion, who acquired his wealth, not by accident or gift, like Ismenias the Theban (who has recently made himself as rich as Polycrates), but by his own skill and industry, and who is a well- conditioned, modest man, not insolent, or overbearing, or annoying; moreover, this son of his has received a good education, as the Athenian people certainly appear to think, for they choose him to fill the highest offices.
But they could not bear the thought of growing rich on money so acquired, and felt as though they could never hope to prosper with it.
Arthur Gride was tried for the unlawful possession of the will, which he had either procured to be stolen, or had dishonestly acquired and retained by other means as bad.
Immediately the operation of boring was commenced; and by the aid of powerful machines, a few weeks later, the inner surface of the immense tube had been rendered perfectly cylindrical, and the bore of the piece had acquired a thorough polish.
But fear of man is slowly acquired, as I have elsewhere shown, by various animals inhabiting desert islands; and we may see an instance of this, even in England, in the greater wildness of all our large birds than of our small birds; for the large birds have been most persecuted by man.
Hence, we may conclude, that domestic instincts have been acquired and natural instincts have been lost partly by habit, and partly by man selecting and accumulating during successive generations, peculiar mental habits and actions, which at first appeared from what we must in our ignorance call an accident.
That was why I asked you the question, I replied, because I see that you are indifferent about money, which is a characteristic rather of those who have inherited their fortunes than of those who have acquired them; the makers of fortunes have a second love of money as a creation of their own, resembling the affection of authors for their own poems, or of parents for their children, besides that natural love of it for the sake of use and profit which is common to them and all men.
In the third place, even in the clearest cases of acquired habit, such as speaking, some instinct is required to set in motion the process of learning.