acoustic schwannoma

vestibular schwannoma

a benign but life-threatening tumor arising from Schwann cells, usually of the vestibular division of the eighth cranial nerve in early stage; produces hearing loss, tinnitus, and vestibular disturbances and in late stages cerebellar, brainstem, and other cranial nerve signs and increased intracranial pressure.

acoustic schwannoma

A non-malignant but hardly benign tumour of the cells of the sheath of Schwann on the acoustic nerve. The tumour causes one-sided deafness and tinnitus and eventually expands inwards into the cranial cavity to occupy the space between the cerebellum and the pons of the brainstem (the cerebello-pontine angle). Surgical approach is difficult but untreated growing tumours are liable to prove fatal. Also known as acoustic neuroma or vestibular schwannoma. (Theodor Schwann, 1810–82, German anatomist).
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass on the intracanalicular segment of cranial nerve VIII on the left side, consistent with acoustic schwannoma.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an enhancing 5 x 3-mm mass on the intracanalicular segment of cranial nerve VIII on the left, consistent with acoustic schwannoma (figure 1).
A 55-year-old woman with acoustic schwannoma was scheduled for craniotomy.
SRS was performed for acoustic schwannoma either as first-time treatment or for residual tumor.
These indications include acoustic schwannomas and complex meningiomas that may be close to hearing and visual anatomy, respectively, and large pituitary lesions, for example, that require the accumulation of a large dose over multiple sessions to protect healthy brain tissues.
Primary extracranial meningiomas of the head and neck have also shown to have a relationship with neurofibromatosis, particularly type 2 NF characterized by bilateral acoustic schwannomas and lack of skin findings and having a defect on chromosome 22q with an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern [3].
A leading neurosurgery team of UF faculty physicians at Shands used the new Trilogy Tx(TM) medical linear accelerator from Varian Medical Systems to treat three men and five women for conditions that included arteriovenous malformations, acoustic schwannomas, meningioma, and metastatic brain tumors.

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