granule

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granule

 [gran´ūl]
1. a small particle or grain.
2. a small pill made of sucrose.
acidophil g's granules staining with acid dyes.
aleuronoid g's colorless myeloid colloidal bodies found in the base of pigment cells.
alpha g's
1. oval granules found in blood platelets; they are lysosomes containing acid phosphatase.
2. large granules in the alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans; they secrete glucagon.
3. acidophilic granules in the acidophils of the adenohypophysis.
amphophil g's granules that stain with both acid and basic dyes.
azurophil g's (azurophilic g's) coarse reddish granules that contain myeloperoxidase and stain easily with azure dyes, found in mature neutrophils and their precursor cells.
Babès-Ernst granule metachromatic granule.
basophil granule
1. a granule that stains with basic dyes.
2. one of the coarse bluish-black granules found in basophils.
3. (in plural) beta granules (def. 2).
beta g's
1. granules in the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans; they secrete insulin.
2. basophilic granules in the basophils of the adenohypophysis.
Birbeck g's rod- or tennis racquet–shaped inclusions with a central linear, longitudinally striated nucleus, found in the cytoplasm of Langerhans' cells.
chromatic g's (chromophilic g's) Nissl bodies.
cone g's the nuclei of the visual cells in the outer nuclear layer of the retina that are connected with the cones.
eosinophil granule one of the coarse round granules that stain with eosin and are found in eosinophils.
iodophil g's granules staining brown with iodine, seen in polymorphonuclear leukocytes in various acute infectious diseases.
lamellar granule keratinosome.
metachromatic granule a granular cell inclusion that stains a color different from that of the dye used. In certain bacteria, yeasts, yeastlike fungi, and protozoa, metachromatic granules appear red when stained with a blue dye. They are composed of complex polyphosphate, lipid, and nucleoprotein molecules (volutin) and serve as an intracellular phosphate reserve. Called also Babès-Ernst body or granule.
Nissl's g's Nissl bodies.
oxyphil g's acidophil granules.
pigment g's small masses of coloring matter in pigment cells.
rod g's the nuclei of the visual cells in the outer nuclear layer of the retina; they are connected with the rods.
Schüffner's g's Schüffner's dots.
seminal g's the small granular bodies in the semen.

gran·ule

(gran'yūl),
1. A grainlike particle; a granulation; a minute discrete mass.
2. A small pill, usually gelatin or sugar coated, containing a drug to be given in a small dose.
3. A colony of the bacterium or fungus causing a disease or simply colonizing the tissues of the patient. In immunocompromised patients, differentiation is difficult.
4. A small particle that can be seen by electron microscopy; contains stored material.
[L. granulum, dim. of granum, grain]

granule

/gran·ule/ (gran´ūl)
1. a small particle or grain.
2. a small pill made from sucrose.

acidophil granules  granules staining with acid dyes.
acrosomal granule  a large globule contained within a membrane-bounded acrosomal vesicle, which enlarges further to become the core of the acrosome of a spermatozoon.
alpha granules 
1. oval granules found in blood platelets; they are lysosomes containing acid phosphatase.
2. large granules in the alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans; they secrete glucagon.
3. granules found in the acidophils of the adenohypophysis.
azurophil granule  one staining easily with azure dyes; they are coarse reddish granules seen in many lymphocytes.
basal granule  see under body.
basophil granule 
1. any granule staining with basic dyes.
2. one of the coarse bluish-black granules found in basophils.
3. (pl.) beta g's (2).
beta granules 
1. granules in the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans; they secrete insulin.
2. granules found in the basophils of the adenohypophysis.
Birbeck granules  membrane-bound rod- or tennis racquet–shaped structures with a central linear density, found in the cytoplasm of Langerhans' cells.
chromaffin granules  organelles in the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, where epinephrine and norepinephrine are synthesized, stored, and released.
elementary granules  hemoconia.
eosinophil granule  one of the coarse round granules that stain with eosin and are found in eosinophils.
iodophil granules  granules staining brown with iodine, seen in polymorphonuclear leukocytes in various acute infectious diseases.
keratohyalin granules  irregularly shaped granules, representing deposits of keratohyalin on tonofibrils in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis.
lamellar granule  keratinosome.
Langerhans granules  Birbeck g's.
membrane-coating granule  keratinosome.
metachromatic granule  a granular cell inclusion present in many bacterial cells, having an avidity for basic dyes and causing irregular staining of the cell.
Nissl's granules  see under body.
oxyphil granules  acidophil g's.
pigment granules  small masses of coloring matter in pigment cells.
proacrosomal granule  one of the small, dense bodies found inside one of the vacuoles of the Golgi body, which fuse to form an acrosomal granule.
Schüffner's granules  see under dot.
seminal granules  the small granular bodies in the spermatic fluid.
specific atrial granules  membrane-bound spherical granules with a dense homogeneous interior that are concentrated in the core of sarcoplasm of the atrial cardiac muscle, extending in either direction from the poles of the nucleus, usually near the Golgi complex; they are the storage site of atrial natriuretic peptide.

granule

(grăn′yo͞ol)
n.
1. A small grain or pellet; a particle.
2. Geology A rock or mineral fragment larger than a sand grain and smaller than a pebble, between 2 and 4 millimeters in diameter.
3. Astronomy One of the small, transient, luminous markings in the photosphere of the sun.
4. Biology A cellular or cytoplasmic particle, especially one that stains readily.

granule

[gran′yo̅o̅l]
Etymology: L, granulum, little grain
a particle, grain, or other small dry mass capable of free movement. Unlike powders, granules are usually free flowing because of small surface forces involved.

gran·ule

(gran'yūl)
1. A grainlike particle; a granulation; a minute discrete mass.
2. A very small pill, usually gelatin- or sugar-coated, containing a drug to be given in a small dose.
3. A colony of the bacterium or fungus causing a disease or simply colonizing the tissues of the patient.
4. A small particle that can be seen by electron microscopy; contains stored material.
[L. granulum, dim. of granum, grain]

Granule

A small grain or pellet. Medicines that come in granule form usually are mixed with liquids or sprinkled on food before they are taken.

gran·ule

(gran'yūl)
1. Grainlike particle; a granulation; minute discrete mass.
2. A small pill, usually gelatin or sugar coated, containing a drug to be given in a small dose.
3. Colony of bacterium or fungus causing disease or simply colonizing tissues of patient. In immunocompromised patients, differentiation is difficult.
4. Small particle that can be seen by electron microscopy; contains stored material.
[L. granulum, dim. of granum, grain]

granule

1. a small particle or grain.
2. a small pill made of sucrose.

acidophil g's
granules staining with acid dyes.
aleuronoid g's
colorless myeloid colloidal bodies found in the base of pigment cells.
alpha g's
1. oval granules found in blood platelets; they are lysosomes containing acid phosphatase.
2. large granules in the alpha cells of the islets of Langerhans; they secrete glucagon.
3. acidophilic granules in the alpha cells of the adenohypophysis.
amphophil g's
granules that stain with both acid and basic dyes.
azur g's, azurophil g's
granules that stain easily with azure dyes; they are coarse, reddish granules and are seen in many lymphocytes.
basophil g's
granules staining with basic dyes.
beta g's
1. granules in the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans that secrete insulin.
2. basophilic granules in the beta cells of the adenohypophysis.
granule cell
the largest group of cells produced by the external germinal layer on the external surface of the embryonal cerebellum; they form the thick granular layer of the cerebellum; called also granule neurons.
chromatic g's, chromophilic g's
see nissl bodies.
cone g's
the nuclei of the visual cells in the outer nuclear layer of the retina which are connected with the cones.
eosinophil g's
those staining with eosin. See also alpha granules (above).
epsilon granule
see neutrophil granules (below).
Grawitz's g's
minute granules seen in the erythrocytes in the basophilia of lead poisoning.
iodophil g's
granules staining brown with iodine, seen in polymorphonuclear leukocytes in various acute infectious diseases.
keratohyalin granule
keratin precursor; in the stratum granulosum of the epithelium.
metachromatic g's
granules present in mast cells and many bacterial cells, having an avidity for basic dyes and causing irregular staining of the cell.
mitochondrial g's
organelles in osteoblasts through which temporary calcium ion sequestration can be effected.
granule neurons
see granule cell (above).
neutrophil g's
neutrophilic granules from the protoplasm of polymorphonuclear leukocytes; called also epsilon granules.
Nissl's g's
see nissl bodies.
oxyphil g's
acidophil granules.
pigment g's
small masses of coloring matter in pigment cells.
primary g's
the peroxidase-positive granules of neutrophils, most prominent in the progranulocyte and early myelocyte stages.
rod g's
the nuclei of the visual cells in the outer nuclear layer of the retina which are connected with the rods.
secondary g's
the peroxidase-negative ('specific') granules seen in mature neutrophils.
seminal g's
the small granular bodies in the semen.
sulfur g's
see sulfur granule.
toxic g's
dark-staining granules in neutrophils that contain peroxidase and acid hydrolases. They occur in inflammatory reactions.