acid-detergent fiber

acid-detergent fiber

see fiber.
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Nutritional parameters for our seeds of switchgrass, guineagrass, Texas millet, and plains bristlegrass, respectively, were: protein (%) 16, 18, 13, and 13; fat (%) 15, 14, 15, and 15; acid-detergent fiber (%) 28, 35, 28, and 41; and gross energy (kcal/g) 4.
Percentage acid-detergent fiber was determined using methods of Goering and Van Soest (1970).
Samples were analyzed for neutral-detergent fiber and acid-detergent fiber with an ANKOM fiber analyzer (ANKOM Technology, Fairport, New York), and acid-detergent lignin using a 72% solution of sulfuric acid (Goering and Van Soest, 1970).
1367xRCP (1) Definitions: MY = Milk yield (kg/d); FY = Milk fat yield (kg/d); PY = Milk protein yield (kg/d); MOL = Month of lactation, variable whose value is equal to 1 for the first month, 2 for the second one, 3 for the third one and 4 for the remaining months of lactation; RADF = Ration acid-detergent fiber (% of DM); RNDF = Ration neutral-detergent fiber (% of DM); RCP = Ration crude protein (% of DM); WIM = Weeks in milk; FBW = Full body weight (kg); FCM = 4% fat corrected milk (kg/d); TEMP = Temperature adjustment factor for DMI; MUD = Mud adjustment factor for DMI; Lag = Adjustment factor for DMI during early lactation; WOL = Week of lactation.
Stems and leaves were analyzed separately for crude protein, neutral-detergent fiber, acid-detergent fiber, lignin, and cellulose.
Stems and leaves were analyzed separately for crude protein (micro-Kjeldahl), neutral detergent-fiber (NDF), acid-detergent fiber (ADF), lignin, and cellulose (Goering and Van Soest 1970; Mould and Robbins 1981, 1982; Hanley et al.
Samples of diet, orts, and feces were analyzed for neutral-detergent fiber and acid-detergent fiber with an ANKOM fiber analyzer (ANKOM Technology, Fairport, New York; Goering and Van Soest, 1970).
Digestibility of neutral-detergent fiber and acid-detergent fiber also varied among species ([F.
1a), but digestion of acid-detergent fiber was not.
Digestion of acid-detergent fiber by wild boars was relatively high compared to other hindgut fermenters, although they were only significantly higher than turkeys.
Lignin concentration and acid-detergent fiber nitrogen have been suggested as indicators of heat damaged silage (Van Soest, 1982) and would provide useful additional information.