acid mist

acid mist

a mist containing a high concentration of acid or particles of any toxic chemical, such as carbon tetrachloride or silicon tetrachloride. Such chemicals are often used by industry and stored in tanks that may leak their contents into residential areas, becoming especially dangerous if the toxic substance mixes with fog. Inhalation of acid mists may irritate the mucous membranes, the eyes, and the respiratory tract and seriously upset the chemical balances of the body. See also acid rain.
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EPA and DOJ alleged that Simplot made modifications at its five sulfuric acid plants without applying for or obtaining the necessary Clean Air Act permits and best available control technology limits for SO2, and for sulfuric acid mist and fine particles (PM2.
15, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- About electrostatic precipitators Electrostatic precipitators are industrial emission control units designed for particulate and acid mist removal from industrial exhaust gas streams.
HRH Lime offers better removal of acidic gas pollutants such as sulfuric acid mist and hydrochloric acid.
ESS), an air-testing firm based in Wilmington, North Carolina, has had success utilizing alternative methodologies in sampling for Sulfuric Acid Mist (H2SO4).
Mount Tambora spewed out massive amounts of sulphur dioxide which combined with water vapour to form a sulphuric acid mist that reflected sunlight away from the earth.
Acid mist, oil mist and water droplets can be monitored in pipes and ducts of all sizes and over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.
In addition, the utility will construct and demonstrate new technology to significantly reduce sulfuric acid mist emissions, a known public health threat, from coal-fired power plants.
pay compensation for vehicles damaged by sulfuric acid mist leaked from a Toray factory early this month, company officials said Wednesday.
Another contends that the aerosol is an acid mist and that it encloses a gaseous, hot core of reactive chemicals.
The case was brought by Terry Smothers, whose job as a lube technician for a trucking company exposed him to acid mist and fumes.
But medical negligence lawyer Graham Ross, of Liverpool, believes the more likely cause is sulphuric acid mist to which workers were exposed.
Laboratory studies that mimic precipitation conditions show dogwoods bathed in acid mist to be strikingly vulnerable to infection.