achievement goal

achievement goal

a goal focused on demonstrating high ability to oneself or others, or to avoid demonstrating low ability.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, the dichotomous achievement goal model has been developed to the 2x2 model.
A recent study titled "Effect of Verbal Praise on Achievement Goal Orientation, Motivation, and Performance Attribution"' investigated the nature and impact of two common types of positive feedback.
The focus of the current project was on the interplay between such stereotype threat concerns and achievement goal pursuits in predicting women's levels of procrastination in STEM classrooms.
Research on children's motivation toward physical activity has utilized two main theories namely the self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985) and the achievement goal theory (Nicholls, 1989) both representative of modern social-cognitive theories of motivation.
The most recently posited and most contested achievement goal is mastery-avoidance, defined as a "focus on avoiding self-referential or task-referential incompetence .
2012), Achievement goal theory, conceptualization of ability/intelligence, and classroom climate.
Reliability and validity evidence of scores on the achievement goal tendencies questionnaire in a sample of Spanish students of compulsory secondary education.
In considering achievement goal orientation in the music classroom, educators would do well to realize that students might approach their performance and membership in the ensemble from dramatically different viewpoints.
Achievement goal theory is based on the assumption that individuals are goal-directed, and these achievement goals guide decision-making and behavior within the context of achievement (Treasure and Roberts 2001).
The development and validation of scales assessing students' achievement goal orientations.
Over the past several decades, achievement goal frameworks have provided one of the main models laying the groundwork for the study of motivational processes in the physical domain.
The achievement goal approach has become one of the most important conceptual avenues to describing and/or explaining motivated behavior (Roberts, 2001).