acetyl coenzyme A


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acetyl coenzyme A

/ac·e·tyl co·en·zyme A/ (ko-en´zīm) acetyl CoA; an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the chief precursor of lipids and steroids; it is formed by the attachment to coenzyme A of an acetyl group during the oxidation of carbohydrates, fatty acids, or amino acids.

acetyl coenzyme A

n.
A compound, C25H38N7O17P3S, that functions as a coenzyme in many biological acetylation reactions and is formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Also called acetyl-coA.

acetyl coenzyme A

An important metabolic agent that transfers acetyl groups to the KREBS CYCLE and to various synthesizing pathways. Usually abbreviated to acetyl CoA.

acetyl coenzyme A

an important metabolic intermediate, involved in various metabolic pathways, including glucose and fatty acid oxidation, and degradation of some amino acids. It also represents a key intermediate in lipid biosynthesis. Commonly referred to as acetyl CoA. See also Krebs cycle.