acetone

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acetone

 [as´ĕ-tōn]
a compound, CH3·CO·CH3, with a characteristic odor; it is used as a solvent and as an antiseptic. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and metabolic acidosis. See also ketosis.

ac·e·tone

(as'e-tōn),
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies, and is used as a solvent in many pharmaceutical and commercial preparations.
Synonym(s): dimethyl ketone

acetone

/ac·e·tone/ (as´ĕ-tōn) a flammable, colorless, volatile liquid with a characteristic odor, which is a solvent and antiseptic and is one of the ketone bodies produced in ketoacidosis.

acetone

(ăs′ĭ-tōn′)
n.
A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid ketone, C3H6O, widely used as an organic solvent. It is one of the ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood and urine when fat is being metabolized.

ac′e·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

acetone

[as′ətōn]
a colorless, aromatic, volatile liquid ketone body found in small amounts in normal urine and in larger quantities in the urine of diabetics experiencing ketoacidosis or starvation. It is one of the group of compounds called ketones. Commercially prepared acetone is used to clean the skin before injections, but prolonged exposure to the compound can be irritating. It also has many varied industrial uses. Also called 2-propanone.

Acetone

Chemistry A colourless, highly volatile and flammable solvent* which is the simplest ketone. It mixes with water, ethanol and oil; it melts at 95.4º C and boils at 56º C.
Endocrinology A so-called ketone body which is normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals, produced by oxidation of fats. Ketones are increased in diabetes, markedly so in diabetic ketoacidosis and starvation. 
Toxic range > 20 mg/dL
*Acetone is used as a solvent in chemical, cosmetic—e.g., nail polish remover—and pharmaceutical industries.

acetone

Endocrinology A ketone body normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals produced by oxidation of fats; ketones ↑ in DM, DKA, starvation. See Ketone body.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid; small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic patients; sometimes imparts an ethereal odor to the urine and breath as a result of starvation or excessive vomiting. Used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations and as a fixative for fluorescent antibody stains.

acetone

A KETONE body derived from acetyl coenzyme A in untreated DIABETES or starvation. See also ACETONE BODY.

acetone 

Liquid ketone (dimethyl ketone and propanone) used as a solvent for many organic compounds (e.g. cellulose acetate) and for repairing spectacle frames.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath.

acetone (as´ətōn),

n Dimethylketone; 1. an organic solvent.
2. in the body, a chemical that is formed when the body uses fat instead of glucose for energy. The formation of acetone means that cells lack insulin or cannot effectively use available insulin to burn glucose for energy. It passes through the body into the urine as ketone bodies.
3. the simplest ketone. It is normally present in urine in small amounts but can increase in those who have diabetes mellitus. Results in having “fruity” acetone breath.

acetone

a compound, CH3COCH3, with solvent properties and characteristic odor, obtained by fermentation or produced synthetically; it is a by-product of acetoacetic acid. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, metabolic acidosis, pregnancy toxemia and acetonemia of ruminants.

acetone bodies
acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-oxybutyric acid, being intermediates in fat metabolism. Called also ketone bodies.
acetone poisoning
in companion animals causes narcosis, gastritis and renal and hepatic damage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the experience with hepatotoxic side effects due to the use of aqueous, ethanolic, and acetonic kava extracts, as well as herbs-kava mixtures in a few patients, efforts have to be undertaken to improve kava quality.
Kava hepatotoxicity: comparison of aqueous, ethanolic, acetonic kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures.
However, the better activity of acetonic extract might be due to more hydrogen-donating components contained within the extracts.
In the present study, the chelating activity of the acetonic, methanolic, and hot water extracts from the fruiting bodies of P.
0 mg/ml, the xanthine oxidase inhibition of acetonic, methanolic, and hot water extracts ranged from 3.
1993), both root extracts dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (the methanolic root extract at 100 [micro]g/ml and the acetonic root extract starting from 50 [micro]g/ml, see Fig.
Our findings reveal that the leaf extract exerts a lower toxicity as compared to the root extracts, and that there is no difference between acetonic and methanolic root extracts.
Data from the present study on mortality of two concentration of acetonic leaf extract of O.
Elham Salari, Kamal Ahmadi, Reza Zamani: Study on the Effects of Acetonic Extract of Otostegia Persica (Labiatae) on Three Aphid Species and One Stored Product Pest
The cytotoxicity of the ethanolic and acetonic extracts and of 6 kavapyrones were investigated in the MTT test (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,4-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) using rat hepatocytes and human HepG2 cells (Gebhardt, 2001).