acetone


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Related to acetone: hexane, Acetone Breath, Acetone peroxide

acetone

 [as´ĕ-tōn]
a compound, CH3·CO·CH3, with a characteristic odor; it is used as a solvent and as an antiseptic. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and metabolic acidosis. See also ketosis.

ac·e·tone

(as'e-tōn),
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies, and is used as a solvent in many pharmaceutical and commercial preparations.
Synonym(s): dimethyl ketone

acetone

/ac·e·tone/ (as´ĕ-tōn) a flammable, colorless, volatile liquid with a characteristic odor, which is a solvent and antiseptic and is one of the ketone bodies produced in ketoacidosis.

acetone

(ăs′ĭ-tōn′)
n.
A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid ketone, C3H6O, widely used as an organic solvent. It is one of the ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood and urine when fat is being metabolized.

ac′e·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

acetone

[as′ətōn]
a colorless, aromatic, volatile liquid ketone body found in small amounts in normal urine and in larger quantities in the urine of diabetics experiencing ketoacidosis or starvation. It is one of the group of compounds called ketones. Commercially prepared acetone is used to clean the skin before injections, but prolonged exposure to the compound can be irritating. It also has many varied industrial uses. Also called 2-propanone.

Acetone

Chemistry A colourless, highly volatile and flammable solvent* which is the simplest ketone. It mixes with water, ethanol and oil; it melts at 95.4º C and boils at 56º C.
Endocrinology A so-called ketone body which is normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals, produced by oxidation of fats. Ketones are increased in diabetes, markedly so in diabetic ketoacidosis and starvation. 
Toxic range > 20 mg/dL
*Acetone is used as a solvent in chemical, cosmetic—e.g., nail polish remover—and pharmaceutical industries.

acetone

Endocrinology A ketone body normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals produced by oxidation of fats; ketones ↑ in DM, DKA, starvation. See Ketone body.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid; small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic patients; sometimes imparts an ethereal odor to the urine and breath as a result of starvation or excessive vomiting. Used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations and as a fixative for fluorescent antibody stains.

acetone

A KETONE body derived from acetyl coenzyme A in untreated DIABETES or starvation. See also ACETONE BODY.

acetone 

Liquid ketone (dimethyl ketone and propanone) used as a solvent for many organic compounds (e.g. cellulose acetate) and for repairing spectacle frames.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath.

acetone (as´ətōn),

n Dimethylketone; 1. an organic solvent.
2. in the body, a chemical that is formed when the body uses fat instead of glucose for energy. The formation of acetone means that cells lack insulin or cannot effectively use available insulin to burn glucose for energy. It passes through the body into the urine as ketone bodies.
3. the simplest ketone. It is normally present in urine in small amounts but can increase in those who have diabetes mellitus. Results in having “fruity” acetone breath.

acetone

a compound, CH3COCH3, with solvent properties and characteristic odor, obtained by fermentation or produced synthetically; it is a by-product of acetoacetic acid. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, metabolic acidosis, pregnancy toxemia and acetonemia of ruminants.

acetone bodies
acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-oxybutyric acid, being intermediates in fat metabolism. Called also ketone bodies.
acetone poisoning
in companion animals causes narcosis, gastritis and renal and hepatic damage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EU also has legislated that all mixtures of MEK, Acetone and other solvents are to be considered as controlled substances.
Highly sensitive acetone measurements were already possible with other instruments, for instance mass spectrometers, which are large laboratory devices that cost several hundred thousand Swiss francs.
4, the 4% Acetone blend with B20 gives relatively higher HC emissions at full load as compared with other blends.
campestris (Sarson) using ethanol and acetone as solvents against S.
Yes, but it takes a lot of scraping and soaking, and the acetone feels very harsh on your skin.
Neem (ethanol) extract at 500 mg/L (with 50% acetone as diluent) caused the highest mortality and killed 100% of A.
Aqueous acetone solutions are generally most effective in removing both condensed and hydrolyzable tannins.
Obtain up-to-date information on Brazil's Acetone industry
Key players in the global acetone market include The DOW Chemical Company, BASF, INEOS Phenol GmbH, CEP SA Quimica, Shell Chemicals, Honeywell and Shanghai Sinopec Mitsui Co.
The plant samples were ground to pass 2 mm sieve and the powder plant samples were separately extracted with three different solvents aqueous methanol (methanol: water, 80:20 v/v), aqueous ethanol (ethanol: water, 80:20 v/v) and aqueous acetone (acetone: water, 80:20 v/v).