acedia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to acedia: Seven deadly sins

a·ce·di·a

(ă-sē'dē-ă),
Obsolete term for a mental syndrome, the chief features of which are listlessness, carelessness, apathy, and melancholia.

acedia

[əsē′dē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, akedia, apathy
a condition of listlessness and a form of melancholia, marked by indifference and sluggish mental processes.

acedia

A nebulous and obsolete term for a state of melancholy, apathy and disinterest in the environment. The modern equivalents would be the blues, abulia.

acedia

(ă-sē′dē-ă) [L. fr. Gr. akēdeia, heedlessness]
Mental state of indifference, insensibility; lack of energy or emotion; apathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
From this point of view, the immediate extension to clinical work with depressed patients of moralistic strategies for overcoming the sin of acedia vel tristitia does not lack obvious theoretical difficulties.
Acedia was, and is, almost a given for those living a monastic life--the commitment to place, work, and daily rhythms of prayer inevitably is dogged by periods of restlessness, malaise, even hopelessness.
7) For a similar list of the symptoms of acedia, see Forster
It is less well-understood--and Kekes is perceptive to point this out--that what makes the numbness of acedia so disquieting is that it undercuts the individual's own ability to cope with it: "Resistance or recovery seem hopeless because they depend on the very self that is disintegrating.
True, they are lives of noisy desperation, hindered by psychoses, prey to boredom and acedia, and permeated from top to bottom with sex--but what could be more ordinary than that?
precisely captures the state of acedia or dejection of spirit (accidie)
Ausdrucklich ordnet Albertinus den Symptomenkomplex des Melancholischen der Acedia zu .
There are interior ascetical practices: control of thoughts, struggle against gluttony, lust, avarice, anger, boredom, vainglory, pride, and acedia (i.
The poet who is lost in a world of acedia and sexual excess is not Flaubert here but Warren himself, still in the sexual thrall and moral entanglement of his first marriage.
This article focuses on the relevance of early Christian writings on acedia and tristitia to the primary modern and postmodern maladies of the subject, i.
But two obvious contenders come readily to mind for anyone who has studied the sin of sloth, or acedia (Dante himself uses the Italian word accidia [Purg.
They are pride, avarice, envy, wrath, lust, gluttony, and sloth or acedia.