acebutolol


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Related to acebutolol: Acebutolol hydrochloride

acebutolol

 [as″ĕ-bu´to-lol]
a cardioselective β1-adrenergic blocking agent with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity; used in the form of the hydrochloride salt for treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, and arrhythmias; administered orally.

acebutolol

/ac·e·bu·to·lol/ (as″ĕ-bu´tah-lol) a cardioselective β1-adrenergic blocking agent with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity; used as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of hypertension, anginia pectoris, and arrhythmias.

acebutolol

(ăs′ə-byo͞o′tə-lôl′, -lōl′)
n.
A beta-blocker drug, C18H28N2O4, used in its hydrochloride form to treat hypertension and certain cardiac arrhythmias.

acebutolol

[as′əbo̅o̅′təlol]
an antiadrenergic agent.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, ventricular arrhythmias, and other cardiovascular disorders.
contraindications The drug should not be given to patients with asthma, persistent severe bradycardia, second- and third-degree heart block, overt heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and peripheral vascular disease. It is generally not recommended during pregnancy.
adverse effects The most common side effects include fatigue, bradycardia, bronchospasm, flatulence, hypotension, muscle and joint pains, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, headache, rash, dizziness, and insomnia.

Acebutolol

A cardioselective beta-1-blocker for managing hypertension and tachyarrhythmias.
Adverse effects Antinuclear antibodies (in ±30%), arthralgia, myalgia, skin rash

acebutolol

Sectral® Cardiology A β1-blocker for managing HTN and tachydysrhythmias, effective in most other clinical uses of beta blockers Adverse effects Antinuclear antibodies; SLE-like disease is rare. See β-blocker.

acebutolol

A beta-blocker drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure (HYPERTENSION), ANGINA PECTORIS, heart failure and heart irregularities (arrhythmias). A brand name is Sectral. Formulated with HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE it is marketed as Secadrex.
References in periodicals archive ?
We report herein a case in which treatment with acebutolol was followed by bilateral extensive pleural thickening necessitating withdrawal of the drug.
For the previous nine years, he had regularly taken acebutolol (200mg daily) for systemic hypertension.
The abnormal chest radiograph was attributed to a drug reaction by exclusion of other causes and acebutolol was withdrawn.
Drug-induced pulmonary diseases due to acebutolol and other beta-blockers have been described briefly as parenchymal infiltration and pleurisy (3-7).
Among current beta-blockers, acebutolol seems most likely to induce antinuclear antibodies, but in our case, ANA was negative (4).
During the five year follow-up period after acebutolol withdrawal, there was no resolution or regression of pleural thickening.
According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, the final score, which was four, showed a possible relation between acebutolol usage and pleural thickening (11).
Results from routine product stability testing of lot number 9991052 of Etodolac Capsules found that some capsules from this lot may contain a variable and unknown quantity of acebutolol hydrochloride, a beta blocker.
The administration of a cardioselective beta blocker such as acebutolol hydrochloride to certain patients has the potential to result in serious side effects.
PRONUNCIATION: etodolac = etta doe lak acebutolol = ace a bue tuh lawl