acculturation

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acculturation

 [ah-kul″cher-a´shun]
the process of adapting or learning to take on selected behaviors of another group; change generally occurs between both cultures that are in contact.

acculturation

[əkul′chərā′shən]
1 the process of adopting the cultural traits or social patterns of a different population group.
2 the modification of the culture of a group resulting from association with another group.

acculturation

The process of incorporating the culture, mores and values of another group; the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) that results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While acculturation is in theory bilateral, in most instances the minority culture becomes integrated into the population’s majority culture.

Acculturation

A term which is generally defined as the exchange of cultural features (traditions, values, or religious beliefs comprising the way of life) which results when groups of individuals from different cultures come into continuous direct contact, resulting in an alteration in the cultural patterns of one or both groups. While, theoretically, acculturation can work in both directions, the norm is that the minority population is assimilated into the population’s dominant majority.

ac·cul·tur·a·tion

(ă-kŭl'chŭr-ā'shŭn)
Adaptation by a person or group to customs, values, beliefs, and behaviors of a new country or culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, in relation to their developmental phase, Asian adolescents tend to utilize their social network to deal with cultural adjustment, career decision-making, and acculturative stress (Okubo et al.
An acculturative stress scale for international students: A practical approach to stress measurement.
The way in which the moderating and aggravating variables are represented in the diagram--progressing upwards in the cylinder alongside all of the categories-reflects the idea that both have the potential to impact upon each of the six areas, and both are involved in the progression through the acculturative growth process.
Furthermore, prior studies have suggested that race-related stress, commonly referred to acculturative stress, does impact racial identity, sense of self, and the management of stress (Cokley, 2005; Inman, 2006; Pierre & Mahalik, 2005; Rhee, Chang, & Rhee, 2003; Takeuchit et al.
Acculturative Family Distancing: Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice.
The imposed transformation process has also resulted in acculturative stress with corollary ramifications as reflected in the potential negative outcomes, which are listed in this article.
The Southwest region has been identified as a context in which Mexican-heritage residents experience high levels of acculturative stress, in part due to ethnic discrimination and anti-immigrant sentiments (Guarnaccia et al.
Acculturative stress, social support, and coping: relations to psychological adjustment among Mexican American college students.
In Handbook of Mental Health and Acculturation in Asian American Families, distinguished researchers and clinicians discuss the process of acculturation for individuals and their families, addressing the mental health needs of Asian Americans and examining the acculturative process, its common stressors, and characteristics associated with resiliency.
He focuses on Guyanans now living in New York City and Toronto to examine how acculturation, acculturative stress and resilience relate to each other and to analyze the factors that lead to psychological distress.
In spite of the dominant social and critical perception of Hampton's early history, conclusions that were and are interpreted largely through photographs, as a civilizing and acculturative machine calculated to eradicate vernacular culture and encourage menial subordination of its African American and Amerindian charges, the historical record is not nearly as straightforward; it is frequently contradictory.
Learners with an ESL background are often confronted by unique linguistic, acculturative, and social challenges at home, at school, and in the community.