accretion

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accretion

 [ah-kre´shun]
1. growth by addition of material.
2. accumulation.
adherence of parts normally separated.

ac·cre·tion

(ă-krē'shŭn),
1. Increase by addition to the periphery of material of the same nature as that already present; for example, the manner of growth of crystals. Synonym(s): accrementition (2)
2. In dentistry, foreign material (usually plaque or calculus) collecting on the surface of a tooth or in a cavity.
3. A growing together.
[L. accretio, fr. ad, to, + crescere, to grow]

accretion

/ac·cre·tion/ (ah-kre´shun)
1. growth by addition of material.
2. accumulation.
3. adherence of parts normally separated.

accretion

[əkrē′shən]
Etymology: L, accrescere, to increase
1 growth by the addition of material similar to that already present.
2 the adherence or growing together of parts that are normally separated.
3 an accumulation of foreign material, especially within a cavity. accrete, v., accretive, adj.

ac·cre·tion

(ă-krē'shŭn)
1. Increase by addition to the periphery of material of the same nature as that already present; e.g., the manner of growth of crystals.
2. dentistry Foreign material (usually plaque or calculus) collecting on the surface of a tooth or in a cavity.
3. A growing together of parts normally separate.
[L. accretio, fr. ad, to, + crescere, to grow]

ac·cre·tion

(ă-krē'shŭn)
In dentistry, foreign material (usually plaque or calculus) collecting on the surface of a tooth or in a cavity.
[L. accretio, fr. ad, to, + crescere, to grow]

accretion

1. growth by addition of material.
2. accumulation.
3. adherence of parts normally separated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists looked for galaxies emitting high levels of radiation and x-rays - a classic signature of black holes devouring gas and dust through accretion, or attracting matter gravitationally.
A much more flexible and rich approach is to be found in the work of Carlo Scarpa, who for instance in Verona Castelvecchio restored with respect for the old, and was concerned to cherish (and often emphasise) accretions to the original fabric.
Data from two follow-up examinations over six years showed that smokers develop more calculus (rock-hard calcified accretions on tooth surfaces) but less dental plaque, the bacteriations on tooth surfaces) but less dental plaque, the bacterialaden mucous film that tooth brushing can remove.