accommodative excess

accommodative excess

(ă-kom′ŏ-dāt″ĭv)
Overfocusing of the eye. It causes blurry vision when one views distant objects.

accommodative excess 

A condition in which the subject exerts more accommodation than required for the visual stimulus, or is unable to relax accommodation. It may be due to uncorrected hyperopia, very prolonged near work, emotional problems, spasm of accommodation, uveitis, trigeminal neuralgia, syphilis, meningitis, head trauma, or the side effect of some pharmaceutical agent (e.g. a miotic drug). It is usually associated with convergence excess. The subject reports blurred vision at distance, asthenopia and often headaches. Treatment commonly includes plus lenses and facility exercises, besides therapy of the underlying cause. Syn. hyperaccommodation. Note: spasm of accommodation is one aspect of the general condition of accommodative excess, although some authors consider this term a synonym. See spasm of accommodation; accommodative facility; convergence excess.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They are (1) accommodative insufficiency (AI), the most common finding; (2) accommodative excess (AE) or pseudomyopia; and (3) dynamic accommodative infacility.
Abbreviations: AA = amplitude of accommodation, AE = accommodative excess, AI = accommodative insufficiency, AS/R = accommodative stimulus/response, CISS = Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey, cpm = cycles per minute, D = diopter, DoD = Department of Defense, FEF = frontal eye field, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, mTBI = mild traumatic brain injury, NPA = near point of accommodation, NRA = negative relative accommodation, OD = right eye, OMT = oculomotor training, OS = left eye, P = placebo, pons = pontis, PRA = positive relative accommodation, SEM = standard error of mean, SD = standard deviation, SS = steady-state, SUNY = State University of New York, TBI = traumatic brain injury, VSAT = Visual Search and Attention Test.
found that approximately 4 percent were clinically diagnosed with accommodative excess [11], with 41 percent having some type of clinically documented accommodative dysfunction.