inflection

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Related to accidence: accedence, exceedance, Inflections

inflection

 [in´flek-shun]
the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn),
1. An inward bending.
2. Obsolete term for diffraction.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]

inflection

/in·flec·tion/ (-flek´shun) the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.

inflection

the act of bending inward or the state of being bent inward.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn)
An inward bending.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]

inflection, inflexion

the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.
References in periodicals archive ?
The accidence resulted in the death of the driver of the motorcycle and his companion.
When we vocalize Ugaritic, it is, first, an attempt at reconstructing the phonemic system and the details of accidence, using symbols commonly recognized by comparative Semitists, and which those trained in the field know to have only approximate phonetic value; and it is, secondly, an expression of our understanding of a given text according to the level of knowledge of Ugaritic at the time when a given vocalization is produced (i.
s use of language--his diction, grammatical accidence, syntax, prosody--was significantly, often distinctively, Shakespearean.
Workers in large establishments were more likely to receive sick leave than their counterparts in the smaller establishments, but the incidence of sickness and accidence insurance coverage did not vary by size of establishment.
This also means that the reality is for a moment taken from me (victims of violence or accidence often reports about the "out of body" experience, when they were approaching situation from the side.
1937 Studies in the accidence of the Lindisfarne Gospels.
The age of the apostrophe is therefore officially over, and accidence may never happen again.
The signification of the event, like the destination of the letters themselves, admits its own accidence.