accessory protein


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accessory protein

A protein that works with another protein, e.g., in helping it to fold into its normal shape or become anchored into its preferred location in a cell membrane.
See also: protein
References in periodicals archive ?
The accessory proteins help protect the natural toxin from harsh conditions in your stomach created by enzymes and by gastric acid.
TOR appears to be the progenitor of a new class of endocytotic accessory proteins.
However, few of the accessory proteins that interact with synaptic proteins have been identified to date.
Some of the targets that might be important include structural elements (such as the highly conserved zinc finger motif of the HIV nucleocapsid or the viral enzymes integrase and RNase H), regulatory and accessory proteins, processes (such as transcription, nuclear import and export of viral nucleic acid, and macromolecular interactions), and host targets (adhesion molecules, transcription factors, apoptosis, and signaling pathways).
Curli formation requires a specialised and mechanistically unique transporter in the bacterial outer membrane, as well as two soluble accessory proteins thought to facilitate the safe guidance of the curli subunits across the periplasm and to coordinate their self-assembly at cell surface.
botulinum produces the toxin in association with accessory proteins (toxin complex).
These data indicate that TOR is the progenitor of a new class of endocytotic accessory proteins.
This initiative will explore the mechanisms of action of hormones and growth factors in the regulation of prostate development, growth, and tumorigenesis, focusing on studies of hormone and growth factor action including the mechanisms of action of nuclear hormones, the roles of nuclear accessory proteins, and the signal transduction pathways important for nuclear hormone action in the prostate.
Buford: "XEOMIN varies from all currently available products because it brings with it no accessory proteins.