accessory muscle

accessory muscle

a relatively rare anatomical duplication of a muscle that may appear anywhere in the muscular system. The most common sign associated with an accessory muscle is the appearance of a soft tissue mass. Differential diagnosis without an exploratory operation is difficult because of the similar appearance of some tumors or soft tissue masses, such as ganglia. The appearance of the soft tissue mass associated with an accessory muscle may be transient, or it may be constant, depending on the location of the accessory muscle in relation to motion. In many individuals with accessory muscles, specific treatment is not indicated unless the accessory muscle interferes with normal function.

ac·ces·so·ry mus·cle

(ak-ses'ōr-ē mŭs'ĕl)
A muscle that is not primarily responsible for but does provide assistance in initiating movement.

accessory muscle

Any muscle whose action reinforces that of any other muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The precise PFM contraction assessment was devised by the investigators using a combination of the established methods described in the Introduction section of this article: observation of any accessory muscle use, TPUS, and DRE using the following criteria.
It was remarkable that during 1L cycling with his AL, the pedalling action was very much "whole body", with a great degree of accessory muscle involvement, whereas with the NL the cycling action looked normal.
Current methods of accessory muscle stimulation need to be studied further to improve SCI respiratory management, particularly together with diaphragmatic pacing.
While the patient had a good cough reflex, he had a paradoxical breathing pattern and substantial accessory muscle use, concerning for diaphragmatic dysfunction.
The degree of accessory muscle use was based on the degree of intercostals or sub costal retraction.
Compression of the median nerve and brachial artery by accessory muscle slips leading to clinical neurovasculopathy has been reported.
3) Rarely, compression has been attributed to the presence of an accessory muscle - the anconeus epitrochlearis.
Mild Exacerbation - Patients who have a mild exacerbation of asthma experience dyspnea on exertion, increased respiratory rate, tachycardia, and demonstrate no respiratory accessory muscle use.
In symptomatic patients, treatment options include ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection followed by rehabilitation, while surgical options include fasciotomy or excision of the accessory muscle.
A case similar to the lateral belly of the present case was reported by Arnold & Zech (1977), where, an accessory muscle of the forearm originated from the medial epicondyle and the fascia of the forearm and inserted into the pisiform bone and retinaculum.
Accessory Muscle Activity Contributes to the Variation in Time to Task Failure for Different Arm Postures and Loads.
Patients on NPPV require strict monitoring of their vital signs, cardiac rhythm, dyspnoea, accessory muscle use and blood gas values.