accelerating voltage

accelerating voltage

The voltage applied to a source in mass spectrometry to move ions formed in the source into the instrument’s mass analyser. Accelerating voltage can range from less than 100 volts in quadrupole mass spectrometers, to several thousand volts in sector instruments or in time-of-flight mass spectrometers.
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Prior Information Notice: Supply and installation of transmission electron microscope 120 kv accelerating voltage, with unity of stem microanalysis system and high resolution ccd camera in the icts national center for microscopy at the complutense university of madrid.
These settings are referred to as the x-ray tube accelerating voltage, or kilo volts (kV), and the tube power, or watts (W) used to set the tube at appropriate levels to obtain an image with optimal contrast at the detector.
As it is known the penetration depth, the geometry of the processing zone depends on many parameters like: electron beam current, accelerating voltage, electron beam diameter, electron beam power, etc.
In simple terms, these factors are, themselves, determined by the choice of electron source and the accelerating voltage of the electron column.
The matrix model of the system includes the effects of the main factors: working distance, transversal deflecting angle, the electron beam current, accelerating voltage, and linear speed of the workpiece, on the output parameter the hardening band width--[L.
At first the sections were viewed in the secondary electron imaging mode (standard operational mode) at following settings: working distance 15 mm, accelerating voltage 3 kV.
At a constant accelerating voltage, the beam current determines the dose rate.
A typical range of values for the mean energy loss is about 20 eV to 50 eV which is very small compared to the microscope accelerating voltage.
Also, set accelerating voltage and beam current precisely to get reproducible results.
With their resolving power at an accelerating voltage of only 80 kV, the Titan instruments will allow us to get much deeper and more reliable insight in materials classes previously excluded from high-resolution analysis due to their beam-sensitivity.
In setting up the conditions for quantitative wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analysis a number of parameters have to be defined for each element, namely accelerating voltage, beam current, and (for each element) x-ray line, spectrometer crystal, pulse-height analyser settings, background offsets, and counting times for peak and background.