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abstract

 [ab´strakt]
1. a short description of a scientific presentation or article.
2. a thought process that is oriented toward the development of an idea without application to, or association with, a particular instance. This type of thinking is independent of time and space.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt),
1. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. A condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstract

[ab′strakt, abstrakt′]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
1 a condensed summary of a scientific article, literary piece, or address.
2 to collect data such as from a medical record.
3 a preparation containing the soluble principles of a medication concentration mixed with lactose.
4 difficult to understand because of lack of practicality.

Abstract

Informatics A statement summarising the important points of a text; a brief summary or description of the essential content of an article, chapter or other complete work, often written by the author of the work.
Research
(1) A synopsis of research data that may be presented at scientific meetings and later published in a peer-reviewed journal; abstracts may not be subjected to the same rigorous review as the “lead” articles for the same journal; the purpose of the abstract is to enable the reader to efficiently grasp the essence of the report; the abstract can be very misleading; it is often the only part of the content of an article that will show up in a database.  
(2) A distillation of a presentation at a meeting, congress, conference, symposium, colloquium, seminar, workshop, round table, or other professional gathering.

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. A condensation, summary, or brief description of a scientific or literary article or the results of a study.
2. A preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating it with milk sugar.
3. (ăb-strakt') To collect information from the medical record for research, billing, or statistical purposes.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·stract

(ab'strakt)
1. Preparation made by evaporating a fluid extract to a powder and triturating with milk sugar.
2. Condensation or summary of a scientific or literary article or address.
[L. ab-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
The final algorithm alone identified only 22 episodes not identified by the medical record abstractors, compared with 38 by the earlier validated version of the algorithm.
Seventy psychiatric emergency patients were abstracted simultaneously and independently by two nurse abstractors.
With the expansion of the abstractor network, SmartProp's turn time for abstractor-based searches will be shortened to 48 -- 72 hours.
While abstractor agreement on recent suicidal communications was substantial, there is no standard requiring that it be assessed in these or other accidents.
CMC analyzed the data from the abstractors to determine what was frequently missed or poorly documented and established a "best practice" standard for nursing documentation in the ED.
But once committed to uncertainty, we conscious abstractors can exert ourselves to `local' precision, the lower-order responsibility to get it as `right' as we can.
RILM's global coverage has expanded, most notably with the establishment of new groups of abstractors in China in October 2006, and, beginning in the fall, Thailand as well.
Brook, with contents amassed by 125 contributing abstractors working over a period of three decades, Speaking of Music now emerges as the dominant voice in retrospective indexing of congress reports and papers on musical topics.
While the latest deal will not see the utility directly receiving money, the funds that the Environment Agency receives from it will partially offset the water abstraction charges it levies on Northumbrian Water and other abstractors in the region.
James Lancaster, state representative for District 48; Mary Nixon, executive secretary for Abstractors Board of Examiners; Shelby Taylor, of Shelby Taylor Trucking; Alvin Upton, co-owner of Buy-Rite Foods Inc.
Professions such as abstractors of title and trade association executives, often ignored in other such books, are included here.
The purpose of these conditions is to protect both the natural water environment and the needs of existing abstractors.