abstraction

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Related to abstractive: abstractedly, abstraction, abstracting

abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
that has been constructed by David Kolb in 1971 for measuring the personal learning styles including 12 questions and every question includes four sections measuring the objective experimentation (CE), reflection observation (RO), abstractive conceptualization (AC) and active experimentation (AE), respectively.
Avicenna's analysis of the abstractive power of the human intellect and of the intellectual memory leads him to affirm the immaterial character of the human soul.
The thing that the intellect has that is "proper to itself" and cannot be found "beyond the soul" is the logical complexity and diversity found in the subject-predicate structure of its judgments, which results from the abstractive nature of the human intellect understanding reality in many separate, partial, and inadequate ways.
18) Indeed, Wodeham even goes so far as to suggest that acts of assent or judgment may be classified (as with acts of apprehension) as intuitive or abstractive acts (see L.
Such an approach, which underlines, as is apparent, the abstractive profile of scientific knowledge, requires that it be already determined what, in general, renders reality (res) an object (obiectum); or, what in reality and in the knowing subject cooperate in the unified constitution of knowledge.
165) but it can only work through abstractive insight and distinction: by isolating some features of the object as referentially more significant than innumerable others.
On this basis Sellars argues that the abstractive theory of concept formation of classical empiricism is another version of the Myth of the Given.
Thomas Aquinas provides a complex set of internal sense powers that somehow prepare the phantasm and make it fit for the abstractive work of the agent intellect.
Stump ("The Mechanisms of Cognition: Ockham on Mediating Species") uses Aquinas's species account of perception as a foil for understanding the motives behind Ockham's distinction between intuitive and abstractive cognition.
Part 1 consists of four chapters, and considers our consciousness of being relative to nihilism, metaphysical knowledge of existence, being, the intellect and abstractive intuition, and the status of immediate first principles.
His interpretations of the relevant works of Plato and Aristotle focus on explicit and implicit references to argument as it actually occurs in conversations and discussions rather than as it is filtered through abstractive theories.
38) In saying this, however, I do not mean to suggest that the basic givenist idea does not predate the early modern period; arguably, one can detect it, at least in embryonic form, in Duns Scotus's distinction between intuitive and abstractive cognition--a conception later taken up by his fellow Franciscan William of Ockham, whose influence on the formation of modern empiricism has been duly noted.