abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
That means that if we're looking for a youngster lost in a crowd, the brain areas usually dedicated to recognizing other objects, or even the areas attuned to abstract thought, shift their focus and join the search party.
However, there is another kind of religious belief: belief based on abstract thought, reasoning from evidence and rational conviction.
He said: "As the world gets more complex, and living in it demands more abstract thought, so people are adapting.
The Daily Mail quoted Flynn as saying, "As the world gets more complex, and living in it demands more abstract thought, so people are adapting.
The very evolution of our humanity depends on abstract thought.
Freudenthal challenges the widely held view that Mendelssohn never abandoned the framework of Leibniz-Wolffian metaphysics and interprets his growing skepticism about abstract thought as evidence of his prioritization of a "common sense" approach to epistemology that may be supported by metaphysics as a key to natural religion.
Given that religious truth is built on abstract thought systems, rather than forcing concrete simulations on theoretical models of religious unity a more effective approach to meet the same goal is through religious meaning embedded in abstract pictorial art.
During the spring and summer of the boys' poult-hood, their execution was a fuzzy, abstract thought, like something that would happen someday, but not today.
They use readily available materials and include warm-ups, beginning level activities for lower-functioning students, and intermediate and advanced activities for abstract thought, figurative language, multiple meanings, idioms, and advanced physical exercises.
Human cognition and abstract thought rely on language.
Musical activity strengthens the pathways between the two, which promotes cognitive development, enhances abstract thought processes and improves the ability to multi-task and think creatively.
It is also a challenge, to those of us who teach, to help students transcend this epistemological difficulty: to help them become aware of the unavoidable limitations of abstract thought.