absorbent


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absorbent

 [ab-sorb´ent]
1. able to take in, or suck up and incorporate.
2. a tissue structure involved in absorption.
3. a substance that absorbs or promotes absorption.

ab·sor·bent

(ab-sōr'bent), Avoid the misspelling absorbant.
1. Having the power to absorb, soak up, or incorporate a gas, liquid, light rays, or heat. Synonym(s): absorptive, bibulous
2. Any substance possessing such power.
3. Material used to remove carbon dioxide from circuits in which rebreathing occurs, for example, anesthesia circuit and basal metabolism equipment.

absorbent

/ab·sor·bent/ (-sor´bent)
1. able to take in, or suck up and incorporate.
2. a tissue structure involved in absorption.
3. a substance that absorbs or promotes absorption.

absorbent

[absôr′bənt]
Etymology: L, absorbere, to suck up
1 capable of attracting and incorporating substances into itself.
2 a product or substance that can absorb liquids or gases.

ab·sor·bent

(ăb-sōr'bĕnt)
1. Having the power to soak up or take into itself a gas, liquid, light rays, or heat.
Synonym(s): absorptive.
2. Any substance possessing such power.
3. Material (usually caustic) to remove carbon dioxide from circuits in which rebreathing occurs (e.g., anesthesia equipment).

ab·sor·bent

(ab-sōr'bĕnt) Avoid the misspelling absorbant.
1. Having the power to absorb, soak up, or incorporate a gas, liquid, light rays, or heat.
Synonym(s): absorptive.
2. Any substance possessing such power.

absorbent (abzôrb´ənt),

adj a substance that causes absorption of diseased tissue; taking up by suction.

absorbent

1. able to take in, or suck up and incorporate.
2. a tissue structure, lymphatic or other vessel, involved in absorption.
3. a substance that absorbs or promotes absorption.
Absorbents used pharmaceutically are usually finely ground inert substances applied locally to prevent friction and reduce tissue irritation, e.g. talc, zinc stearate, a mixture of boric acid and calcium oxide. Similar substances, e.g. finely ground charcoal, kaolin, are administered orally for the same purposes and also to absorb toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grease&Oil Absorbent Demand and Self-sufficiency
FIGURE 1 POLYMER ABSORBENTS AND ADSORBENTS -- WORLDWIDE PATENT APPLICATIONS AND PATENTS ISSUED SINCE 1970
This press release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including statements relating to expected results to be achieved by International Absorbents based on its utilization of Ross Systems iRenaissance solution such as gaining enhanced visibility into systems company-wide, complying with quality control and industry regulations, increasing customer satisfaction and supporting overall company growth.
Servicing over 7,000 customers in 16 states, Whitewing also collects and processes crankcase oil, which it then resells to industrial users as an alternative fuel; manufactures and distributes a full line of industrial absorbents, and is engaged in oil filter processing, antifreeze recycling, parts and brake washer sinks and service, waste oil service, laboratory service, and oil water separator service.
Among the many possible end-uses are diapers, other hygiene disposables, medical or consumer wipes, and absorbents that are mandated for the transportation of blood and diagnostic specimens.
i2 ABSORB starts as a simple mixture of chemicals contained in an absorbent material and deploys disinfectant iodine alongside super absorbent and fluff-pulp fibers used in the air-laid non-woven manufacturing industry.
This new facility will enable us to meet growing demand for NovaThin(TM) products and will also serve as a research platform from which we will develop new generations of absorbent materials.
8,664,468 B2 Disposable absorbent articles having an interior design signal: Kathleen Marie Lawson, West Chester, OH, US; Mark John Ciesko, Cincinnati, OH, US; Christofer Fuchs, Wyoming, OH, US; Alizha Victoria Rice, Cincinnati, OH, US; Harald Hermann Hundorf, Bonn, Germany; Horst Blessing, Euskirchen, Germany; Peter Dziezok, Hochheim, Germany; Mattias Schmidt, Idstein, Germany; Holger Beruda, Schwalbach, Germany; and Bruno Johannes Ehrnsperger, Schwalbach, Germany.
is a national distributor of consumer products and is rolling out TrapIt(tm) a revolutionary new deodorizer and absorbent to Wal-Mart stores nationwide.
Absorbent article including an absorbent article main body and an absorbent body overlapping the absorbent article main body: Jun Kudo, Ehime, Japan; Hideyuki Kinoshita, Kagawa, Japan; and Akira Hashino, Kagawa, Japan.