absorb

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absorb

 [ab-sorb´]
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation energy so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

ab·sorb

(ab-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb

/ab·sorb/ (-sorb´)
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to react with radiation energy so as to attenuate it.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

absorb

Absorb

Chemistry To take up a liquid or other substance by another. 
Physiology To assimilate, take in, as occurs in the GI tract, across the skin, and across the renal tubules.
Radiation physics To attenuate.

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb')
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb (əbzôrb´),

v 1. to suck up or be removed.
v 2. to incorporate or assimilate a liquid or gas into tissue or cells.

absorb

1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g. the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
References in classic literature ?
As it proceeded, all movement and all sound ceased, and the deep silence of an absorbed and waiting suspense settled upon the house; and when at last the words came, "THEY DO NOT EVEN RESEMBLE," a thundercrash of applause followed and the house sprang to its feet, but was quickly repressed by official force and brought to order again.
The girl's fervid temp erament intensified the essentially feminine pleasure that most women feel in the passage of the comb through their hair, to a luxury of sensation which absorbed her in enjoyment, so serenely self-demonstrative, so drowsily deep that it did irresistibly suggest a pet cat's enjoyment under a caressing hand.
They grumbled and protested, and would certainly have thus attracted Phileas Fogg's attention if he had not been completely absorbed in his game.
Directly afterwards the distant sound of a heavy weight falling on the ground was heard, but no one paid any attention to it; the nurse was engaged in watching the chemical analysis, and Villefort was still absorbed in grief.
I fancied that each shadow, as the sun descended lower and lower, separated itself sullenly from the trunk that gave it birth, and thus became absorbed by the stream; while other shadows issued momently from the trees, taking the place of their predecessors thus entombed.
With my brow to the glass, I was thus occupied in scrutinizing the mob, when suddenly there came into view a countenance (that of a decrepid old man, some sixty-five or seventy years of age,) - a countenance which at once arrested and absorbed my whole attention, on account of the absolute idiosyncrasy of its expression.
It may be that in order to realise the romance of life you must have something of the actor in you; and, capable of standing outside yourself, you must be able to watch your actions with an interest at once detached and absorbed.
He advanced a few paces, and caught sight of the two screech owls, that is to say, Dom Claude and Master Jacques Charmolue, absorbed in contemplation before a carving on the façade.
His people were sometimes terrified to see him, for hours together, absorbed in silent reverie, mute and insensible; he no longer heard the timid step of the servant who came to the door of his chamber to watch the sleeping or waking of his master.
If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander in chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else- he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
These directions to look here and there irritated her, as interruptions irritate a person absorbed in thought, although she was not thinking of anything.
Mirabel stood, looking at the roses which Emily had left on her chair, as completely absorbed in his own thoughts as if he had been alone in the garden.