absorb

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Related to absorbability: reassert, ameliorative, call on, overhyped, scrutinised, took over

absorb

 [ab-sorb´]
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation energy so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

ab·sorb

(ab-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb

/ab·sorb/ (-sorb´)
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to react with radiation energy so as to attenuate it.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

absorb

Absorb

Chemistry To take up a liquid or other substance by another. 
Physiology To assimilate, take in, as occurs in the GI tract, across the skin, and across the renal tubules.
Radiation physics To attenuate.

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb')
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb (əbzôrb´),

v 1. to suck up or be removed.
v 2. to incorporate or assimilate a liquid or gas into tissue or cells.

absorb

1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g. the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
References in periodicals archive ?
26) Even a mention of Jack Johnson ruptures the elite strategy of reshaping the child's body towards absorbability into whiteness.
It's just not our first priority," said Bob Hamilton, marketing director at Welspun, who noted that the company focuses its attention on other factors, including design, absorbability and laundering.
This is especially true for soil because Pb in soil can exist in a variety of different mineral forms and particle types, some of which tend to have low absorbability.
In experiments on monkeys, the company confirmed that the new formulation has an immediate action equivalent to injections as well as excels in absorbability through nasal mucosa.
lachryma-jobi seed contains different kinds of phytosterols, including sitosterol, sitosterone, campersterol and camperstanol (Chien, 1998; Lin, 1999), among which camperstanol has the best phytosterol selective absorbability, and the next is [beta]-sistosterol (Ikeda et al.
The chief executive of the technology and logistics giant EDS, studying chemical engineering at Princeton University as a young man, elected to write about the absorbability of hydrogen atoms on surfaces.
2000), based on soil intakes of 143-300 g/day for sheep and 900-1600 g/day for cattle, a soil F absorbability of 20-38% and dietary F tolerances of 60 and 40 mg/kg DM for sheep and cattle, respectively, predicted that topsoil F concentrations of >326-1461 mg F/kg would cause fluorosis in sheep and cattle.
The differences in absorbability have led to the concept of dietary folate equivalents (DFE), where 1 DFE = 1 [micro]g food folate = 0.
After receiving Vitality, I read an article suggesting consumers test the absorbability of a multivitamin by putting it in vinegar for 20 minutes.
Symptoms of the diseased abalone included increased mucus, decreased activity, and loss of absorbability.