absorb


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absorb

 [ab-sorb´]
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation energy so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

ab·sorb

(ab-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb

/ab·sorb/ (-sorb´)
1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g., the skin or intestine.
2. to react with radiation energy so as to attenuate it.
3. to retain specific wavelengths of radiation incident upon a substance, either raising its temperature or changing the energy state of its molecules.

absorb

Absorb

Chemistry To take up a liquid or other substance by another. 
Physiology To assimilate, take in, as occurs in the GI tract, across the skin, and across the renal tubules.
Radiation physics To attenuate.

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb')
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

ab·sorb

(ăb-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with adsorb.
1. To take in by absorption.
2. To reduce the intensity of transmitted light.
[L. ab-sorbeo, pp. -sorptus, to suck in]

absorb (əbzôrb´),

v 1. to suck up or be removed.
v 2. to incorporate or assimilate a liquid or gas into tissue or cells.

absorb

1. to take in or assimilate, as to take up substances into or across tissues, e.g. the skin or intestine.
2. to stop particles of radiation so that their energy is totally transferred to the absorbing material.
References in periodicals archive ?
To find out more and apply, visit the Absorb Technology jobs.
Lead researcher and author of a new paper on the plant, Professor Edwino Fernando, says the leaves of Rinorea niccolifera can absorb as much as 18,000 parts per million of the silvery-white metal -- that's up to 1,000 times more nickel than can safely be stored in most other plants.
The ABSORB III test (n=2000) will assess the prospective benefits of the device in people suffering from coronary artery disease in the U.
Absorb is a bioresorbable scaffold designed to treat a patient's blocked vessel and then fully dissolve, leaving the vessel free of a permanent metallic implant.
Fat Absorb is the result of an extensive research that has led to the development of this effective and all-natural weight loss solution.
The body absorbs most of one novel implant, a patch that can fix heart defects, and it degrades the other, a stent that can prop open a narrowed artery.
Katie set out to learn exactly how much arsenic a water hyacinth could absorb.
At the same time, no one knows the exact rate the body absorbs aluminum from food.
The joints of the large pillars supporting the tile roof of the huge temple absorb the shock of earthquakes and allow the pillars to tilt, but once the shaking is over the pillars return to their upright position.
Currently available synthetic monofilament absorbable sutures can take as many as 180 days to absorb, and other absorbable options, such as gut sutures, have weaker tensile strength and can be brittle, compromising knot security.
They also absorb air pollutants such as carbon monoxide, storing them in intracellular spaces, and provide thermal insulation.