absolute alcohol


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alcohol

 [al´kah-hol]
1. any organic compound containing the hydroxy (-OH) functional group except those in which the OH group is attached to an aromatic ring, which are called phenols. Alcohols are classified as primary, secondary, or tertiary according to whether the carbon atom to which the OH group is attached is bonded to one, two, or three other carbon atoms and as monohydric, dihydric, or trihydric according to whether they contain one, two, or three OH groups; the latter two are called diols and triols, respectively.
2. an official preparation of ethanol, used as a disinfectant, solvent, and preservative, and applied topically as a rubbing compound, disinfectant, astringent, hemostatic, and coolant.
absolute alcohol dehydrated a.
benzyl alcohol a colorless liquid used as a bacteriostatic in solutions for injection and as a topical local anesthetic.
dehydrated alcohol an extremely hygroscopic, transparent, colorless, volatile liquid used as a solvent and injected into nerves and ganglia for relief of pain. Called also absolute a.
denatured alcohol ethanol made unfit for human consumption by the addition of substances known as denaturants. Although it should never be taken internally, denatured alcohol is widely used on the skin as a disinfectant.
ethyl alcohol (grain alcohol) ethanol.
isopropyl alcohol a transparent, volatile colorless liquid used as a solvent and disinfectant and applied topically as an antiseptic; called also isopropanol. Diluted with water to approximately 70 per cent strength, it is called isopropyl rubbing alcohol and is used as a rubbing compound.
methyl alcohol methanol.
pantothenyl alcohol dexpanthenol.
phenethyl alcohol (phenylethyl alcohol) a colorless liquid used as an antimicrobial agent in pharmaceuticals.
rubbing alcohol a preparation of acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and ethanol, used as a rubefacient.
wood alcohol methanol.

ab·so·lute al·co·hol

1. 100% alcohol, water having been removed; Synonym(s): anhydrous alcohol
2. alcohol with a minimum admixture of water, at most 1%. Synonym(s): dehydrated alcohol

absolute alcohol

a clear, colorless, highly hygroscopic liquid with a burning taste, containing at least 99.5% ethyl alcohol by volume. Also called dehydrated alcohol.

absolute alcohol

Ethanol that contains ≤ 1% water by weight; it is a critical working reagent in certain areas of the clinical lab, in particular histopathology, where it is required in certain steps of embedding tissues in paraffin.

absolute alcohol

Laboratory Ethanol that contains ≤ 1% water by weight; it is a critical working reagent in certain areas of the clinical laboratory, in particular histopathology, where it is required in certain steps of embedding tissues in paraffin

absolute alcohol

Alcohol from which all water has been removed.

ab·so·lute al·co·hol

(ab-sō-lūt alkō-hol)
A 100% alcohol, water having been removed.
Synonym(s): anhydrous alcohol.

alcohol

1. any organic compound containing the hydroxy (−OH) functional group except those in which the OH group is attached to an aromatic ring, which are called phenols. Alcohols are classified as primary, secondary or tertiary according to whether the carbon atom to which the OH group is attached is bonded to one, two or three other carbon atoms and as monohydric, dihydric or trihydric according to whether they contain one, two or three −OH groups; the latter two are called diols and triols, respectively.
2. common name for ethyl alcohol (ethanol). See also alcoholic.

absolute alcohol
ethyl alcohol free from water and impurities.
complex plant alcohol
includes cicutoxin, oenanthotoxin, tremetol, all toxic, causing heavy mortalities and signs including incoordination, tremor, convulsions, vomiting.
denatured alcohol
ethyl alcohol made unfit for consumption by the addition of substances known as denaturants. Although it should never be taken internally, denatured alcohol is widely used on the skin as a cooling agent and skin disinfectant.
ethoxylate alcohol detergents
alcohols containing an ethyl radical with an attached oxygen group; used in the treatment and prevention of ruminal bloat.
ethyl alcohol
a transparent, colorless, mobile, volatile liquid miscible with water, ether or chloroform, and obtained by the fermentation of carbohydrate with yeast. It is the major ingredient of alcoholic beverages consumed by humans. Called also ethanol and grain alcohol. It is used in veterinary medicine in the preparation of mixtures for topical application and for skin disinfection.
grain alcohol
see ethyl alcohol (above).
isopropyl alcohol
a transparent, volatile colorless liquid used as a rubbing compound. Called also isopropanol.
methyl alcohol
a mobile, colorless liquid used as a solvent. Called also wood alcohol or methanol. It is a useful fuel, but is poisonous if taken internally. Consumption may lead to blindness or death.
alcohol nerve block
permanent anesthesia to a part can be produced by blocking the relevant nerve with isopropyl alcohol. Adverse effects are likely due to continued loss of sensation and motor power.
alcohol poisoning
in animals this does not present the social problems that it does in humans even in cattle and sheep fed on brewer's grains and distiller's solubles. Ethyl alcohol is produced in some feeds which are fermented accidentally, but overt alcohol poisoning is not recorded. Carbohydrate engorgement is a more likely occurrence. Isopropyl alcohol is an end product of ketone body degradation in the rumen in cattle and does cause signs of inebriation in cows with nervous acetonemia.
Small companion animals are sometimes exposed to toxic levels of ethyl alcohol by owners and it may be readily consumed. Excessive amounts can lead to vomiting, various levels of central nervous system depression, including excitement, seizures and respiratory depression.
wood alcohol
methyl alcohol.
References in periodicals archive ?
02 mole) were dissolved in dry benzene (70 ml) and absolute alcohol (10ml) and added ZnCl2.
3 ounces absolute alcohol per day) at the time they conceived during the index pregnancy were approached in the hospital's postpartum unit and asked to participate in the trial.
Standard drink equivalences were 8 g or 8 ml of absolute alcohol.
50 ounces of absolute alcohol per day when the alcohol was consumed in a bingelike fashion.
To know the effect of endoscopic sclerotherapy with absolute alcohol particularly in acute bleeding varices of different grades.
What are the appropriate conversion factors in translating beverage volumes into absolute alcohol volumes?
This paper explores the influence of age distributions on per adult consumption of absolute alcohol in Ontario, Canada.
Use of hypertonic saline and absolute alcohol has also been reported.
Table 1 describes the availability of alcoholic beverages in terms of absolute alcohol in Malaysia, based on Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) food balance sheets.
In the 1995 drinking habits survey in the Aland Islands, the total alcohol consumption of Alanders was estimated at seven to eight liters of absolute alcohol per inhabitant.
Volumes of alcohol purchased from wholesalers contained in this data set were converted to liters of absolute alcohol using the following rates: regular strength beer (0.