abscopal

abscopal

 [ab-sko´p'l]
pertaining to the effect on nonirradiated tissue resulting from irradiation of other tissues of the body.

ab·sco·pal

(ab-skō'păl, -skop'ăl),
Denoting the effect that irradiation of a tissue has on remote nonirradiated tissue.
[ab- + G. skopos, target, + -al]

abscopal

/ab·scop·al/ (-sko´p'l) pertaining to the effect on nonirradiated tissue resulting from irradiation of other tissue of the organism.

abscopal

[abskō′pəl]
pertaining to the effect of irradiated tissue on remote tissue not exposed to radiation.

ab·sco·pal

(ab-skō'păl)
Denoting the effect that irradiation of a tissue has on remote nonirradiated tissue.
[ab- + G. skopos, target, + -al]

abscopal

Pertaining to a reaction in body tissue in an area outside an irradiated zone.

ab·sco·pal

(ab-skō'păl)
Denoting the effect that irradiation of a tissue has on remote nonirradiated tissue.
[ab- + G. skopos, target, + -al]

abscopal

pertaining to the effect on nonirradiated tissue resulting from irradiation of other tissues of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Optimizing cancer treatments to induce an acute immune response: radiation Abscopal effects, PAMPs, and DAMPs.
The phenomenon reported by the researchers, known as the abscopal effect, occurs when localized radiation therapy delivered to a single tumor in a patient with advanced disease results in tumor disappearance outside of the irradiated area.
Unexpectedly, other areas where the melanoma had spread (the spleen and the lymph nodes) but that were not directly targeted by the radiation therapy also benefited, consistent with the abscopal effect.
Scientists are not certain how the abscopal effect works to eliminate cancer in patients.
CancerWeb has defined an abscopal effect as "a reaction produced following irradiation but occurring outside the zone of actual radiation absorption.
The abscopal effect is admittedly rare and, in the past, was considered somewhat controversial, since it seemed to fly in the face of common sense.
What if it were possible to give cancer patients a substance that would actually make the abscopal effect a routine part of treatment?
Kanegesaki, have induced the abscopal effect in mice by first administering a biologically active protein or "chemokine" called ECI301.
It is not exactly a new finding that immune stimulants can trigger the abscopal effect.
The researchers' most important finding was that tumor growth at non-irradiated sites was inhibited, which indicated that ECI301 may have enhanced the abscopal effect.
There has already been at least one attempt to harness the abscopal effect in human patients.
The authors, led by Hu Fang, MD, the president of the sponsoring company, concluded: "The abscopal anti-tumor effect could be induced by the combination of H101 local intratumoral injection with heating" (Hu 2006).