abscise


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abscise

(ăb-sīz′)
v. ab·scised, ab·scising, ab·scises
v.tr.
To cut off; remove.
v.intr.
To shed by abscission.

abscise

to cut off or remove.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dispersal begins when the fruit (and sometimes the enclosing calyx) abscises from the mother plant.
The waxy cuticle of each gland encapsulates the sticky resin until it is needed for protection from herbivory (or to attract humans who disseminate it) and abscise readily as a convenient way of delivering its evolutionarily common allelopathic aromatic constituents, in addition to its evolutionarily unique cannabinoids.
Among all genotypes, but particularly in DP 90, fruit from plants which had undergone moderate and severe water stress (2- and 3-d) was often killed but failed to abscise completely from the plant, leaving the dead bolls or squares remaining attached to the plant (Table 3).
are soon to abscise (Glinwood & Pettersson, 2000; Karban, 2007).
Predation may be more important later in the season when infested fruit does not abscise and plum curculio larvae must drop to the ground from the trees and spend a considerable time burrowing into the soil.
Second, the margins of the valves abscise, again beginning at the distal end of the nut, splitting the husk into four valves.
If the assimilate supply to a boll drops below a threshold level during the first 2 wk after anthesis, then that boll would probably abscise.
These are branches that form and develop concurrent with the RGU on which they form but that are strictly reproductive and abscise after fruiting.
Regardless of many production practices involved in protection of fruiting forms on these positions, they can still abscise because of insect feeding or physiological stress (Guinn, 1982).
Although most leaves abscise by bud-break the following growing season, a small fraction remain, especially in the interior of larger, older trees, into much of the next growing season.
It is thought that mature seeds start to abscise before the later-formed seeds become ripe (Kreft, 1989a).