abiotic factor

Abiotic Factor

Any factor or component that may be found in a living system which may be required by or is integral to the system, but is not itself capable of life, e.g., physical factors, including light, temperature, atmospheric gases, and inorganic chemicals, and geological factors, such as rocks and minerals.

abiotic factor

any contribution to the ENVIRONMENT or ecosystem that is of a nonliving nature, e.g. climate, pH.
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Instead, the only abiotic factor that predicted cliff swallow presence was the distance to water--a variable that was unrelated to canyon wren site occupancy patterns.
In case of non-Bt cotton varieties (during 2010), maximum temperature correlated negatively while relative humidity showed strong positive correlation with whitefly population, whereas minimum temperature was the only abiotic factor that was correlated positively with whitefly
Temperature is also an important abiotic factor because it determines when and where a given type of plant can be grown.
The results suggest that thermal conditions, an abiotic factor, and nitrogen availability, a bottom-up factor, interact to influence insect herbivore abundance in this old-field prairie.
The most important abiotic factor is temperature, which has dominant role in pest population variation (Bale et al.
houstonensis reproduction, further investigation may provide some understanding of this abiotic factor.
Though paper is an artificial substrate, it allows us to investigate the impact of a chosen abiotic factor on the ants' foraging decisions.
Using other abiotic factors, such as temperature or wind, would allow students to test the direct influence of an abiotic factor on populations of aphids.
What do you think would be an abiotic factor that attracts insects?
Because solar exposure is the abiotic factor that has the greatest influence on temperature at the depths at which these turtles nest (Shul'gin, 1957), it is not surprising that turtles would react to this factor to modify nest temperature regimes.