abfraction


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abfraction

 [ab-frak´shun]
pathological loss of tooth structure owing to biomechanical forces (flexion, compression, or tension) or chemical degradation; it is most visible as V-shaped notches in the cervical area of a tooth.

abfraction

(ab-frak'shŭn),
To break away.

abfraction

pathological loss of tooth structure owing to biomechanical forces or chemical degradation; it is most visible as V-shaped notches in the cervical area of the tooth.

ab·frac·tion

(ab-frak'shŭn)
Pathologic loss of hard tooth substance caused by biomechanical loading forces.
[ab- + L. fractio, a breaking, fr. frango, fractum, to break]

ab·frac·tion

(ab-frak'shŭn)
Loss of tooth structure considered due to combined stress on tooth, resulting from flexure and chemical factors; usually evident as a notch on the buccal surface just occlusal to the adjacent gingiva.
[ab- + L. fractio, a breaking, Fr. frango, fractum, to break]

abfraction (abfrak´shən),

n a mechanism that explains the loss of dentin tissue and tooth enamel caused by flexure and ultimate material fatigue of susceptible teeth at locations away from the point of loading. The breakdown is dependent on the magnitude, duration, frequency, and location of the forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent dental research investigating non-carious cervical lesions has resulted in the theory of abfraction, where forces cause flexure and deformation of the teeth, usually at the cervical)
Abfraction is based on principals in physics and engineering.
Abfraction may also serve as a co-contributor to cervical lesions.
Articulating paper, occlusal indicator wax, pressure detecting sheets and other occlusal pressure analyzers are useful tools for assessing the risk of abfraction.
Many dental practitioners do not restore abfractions for two main reasons: the lesions are non-carious, and they are likely to return if the cause of abfraction has not been addressed.
While he indicated that he occasionally clenched his teeth together, clinical signs of torus palatinus, bilateral cheek biting, attrition and abfraction indicated that the habit is more severe than he was aware.
However, in due time, we realized we were missing one other major, but rarely identified, loss of tooth structure: abfraction.
Abfraction is the loss of tooth structure at the cervical region from heavy occlusal forces.
Clinically differentiating abfraction from abrasion requires a detailed comprehensive examination.
Causes of abfraction include excessive chewing and/or biting forces such as bruxism, erosion and corrosion; clenching of the mandible; malocclusion and tongue thrusting.
As a part of the clinical examination, communication with our patients is another key point in identifying abfraction.
The antidepressants she takes cause bruxing (4)and we constantly monitor for wear, recession and abfractions.