aberrant

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ab·er·rant

(ab'er-ant),
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
3. Synonym(s): deviant (1)
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

/ab·er·rant/ (ah-ber´ant) (ab´ur-ant) wandering or deviating from the usual or normal course.

aberrant

aberrant

adjective Abnormal, deviant.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Wandering off; said of certain ducts, vessels, or nerves deviating from the normal course or pattern.
2. Differing from the normal; in botany or zoology, said of certain atypical individuals in a species.
3. Synonym(s): ectopic (1) .
[L. aberrans]

aberrant

Deviating from the normal. The term may be applied to variations in the fine detail of body structure, such as the size and position of small arteries, or to modes of behaviour not generally considered acceptable. See also ABNORMAL.

ab·er·rant

(ab-er'ănt)
1. Differing from the usual or norm; in botany or zoology, used for certain atypical individuals in a species; abnormal.
2. Wandering off; used to describe certain ducts, vessels, or nerves that deviate from the usual or normal course or pattern.
[L. aberrans]

aberrant (aber´ənt),

adj deviating from the usual or normal course, location, or action.
References in periodicals archive ?
The visible aberrance of physical impairment marginalized disabled bodies while Victorian institutions, including fraternal societies as ostensible engines of self-help, had little scope to properly respond to the devastating capacity of 19th-century industrial work to injure and maim.
For example, we may note that Poata's decision to set Ngati in the year of a New Zealand polio scare, and to displace that epidemic in favor of an economic conflict between Maori and Pakeha, reverses the Pakeha cinematic technique of translating colonial violences into psychological or physical aberrance.
42) This concept is fundamentally inconsistent with the notion of defect (mental or otherwise) insofar as the latter necessarily involves aberrance.
His emphasis also inevitably downplays circumstances, such as poverty, that correlate with high rates of street crime and accompanying moral aberrance.
Aberrance is the exaggerated generosity in our public offices.
Michel Foucault argues that the traditional family is designed to be the place where the "truth of sex" is confessed, aberrance monitored and dissuaded, and sexual normality taught, fostered and perpetuated.
Synched to a catchy jazz sound track, Cuoghi's creatures at first humorously parade across the screen as if to flaunt their aberrance.
Even here, however, Dobell, Smith and the others might have found a measure of vindication in the vast palette of subsequent generations' preoccupations with despair, recovery, aberrance, marginality, and self-examination--a palette they helped, in the face of withering critical abuse, to configure.
At stake, I would suggest, is the artificial sanctity of an American ideal: for by isolating images this way the website can emphasize their aberrance while avoiding messy questions about the inextricability of lynch law from familiar routines of national life and familiar modes of national belief.
Freak shows not only constituted "the freak as an icon of generalized embodied deviance," Thomson argues, but also "simultaneously reinscribed gender, race, sexual aberrance, ethnicity, and disability as inextricable yet particular exclusionary systems legitimated by bodily variation - all represented by the single multivalent figure of the freak.
After all, in its common pejorative sense, the grotesque would seem to be the antithesis of the sort of worldliness to which Hickey's title provisionally alludes, a zone not of refinement and urbanity but of disharmony, disenfranchisement, and aberrance.