abductor spasmodic dysphonia

abductor spasmodic dysphonia

a breathy form of spasmodic dysphonia caused by long and excessive vocal fold opening for voiceless phonemes extending into vowels.

ab·duc·tor spas·mo·dic dys·pho·ni·a

(ab-dŭk'tŏr spaz-mod'ik dis-fōn'ē-ă)
A breathy form of spasmodic dysphonia caused by excessive and long vocal cord opening for voiceless phonemes extending into vowels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment of posterior cricoarytenoid botulinum toxin injections in patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia.
Blitzer et al studied 32 patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia and found that after subjective pre- and postoperative evaluations by patients, physicians, and speech pathologists, the patients' percentage of normal function improved on average from 31 to 70%.
As is the case with patients who have adductor spasmodic dysphonia, results in patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia vary, but many do obtain benefit from botulinum toxin injections.
Successful treatment of selected cases of abductor spasmodic dysphonia using botulinum toxin injection.
The three types of spasmodic dysphonia are adductor spasmodic dysphonia, abductor spasmodic dysphonia and mixed spasmodic dysphonia.
In abductor spasmodic dysphonia, sudden involuntary muscle movements or spasms cause the vocal folds to open.
Mixed spasmodic dysphonia involves muscles that open the vocal folds as well as muscles that close the vocal folds and therefore has features of both adductor and abductor spasmodic dysphonia.