abduction

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abduction

 [ab-duk´shun]
the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with adduction. In lecturing and dictation some physicians pronounce the word "A B duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: adduction.
Synonym(s): abductio [TA]
[L. abductio]

abduction

/ab·duc·tion/ (ab-duk´shun) the act of abducting; the state of being abducted.
Enlarge picture
Abduction of the fingers.

abduction

Etymology: L, abducere, to take away
movement of a limb away from the midline or axis of the body. abduct, v. Compare adduction.

Abduction

Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline, where the axis lies on the frontal and sagittal planes.

abduction

Neurology Movement of an extremity on a transverse plane away from the axis or midline. Cf Adduction.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: adduction
[L. abductio]

abduction

A movement outwards from the mid-line of the body or from the central axis of a limb. The opposite, inward, movement is called ADDUCTION.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

abduction

movement sideways of the arm at the shoulder, of the leg at the hip, of a finger, thumb or toe away from the middle of the hand or foot; abductor a muscle with this action; opposite of adduction. Figure 1.

abduct

; abduction movement away from the median line or sagittal plane

abduction (ab·dukˑ·shn),

n joint movement away from the body along the horizontal plane.
Enlarge picture
Abduction.

abduction 

Outward rotation of an eye, that is away from the midline. See duction; Duane's syndrome.

ab·duc·tion

(ab-dŭk'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with adduction.
1. Movement of a body part away from the median plane.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the temple.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
[L. abductio]

abduction (abduk´shən),

n the process of abducting; opposite of adduction.

abduction

the act of abducting; the state of being abducted. For a digit, the drawing away from the axis of the limb.
References in periodicals archive ?
Superintendent Tim Bacon said: "The figures relating to the number of child abductions and kidnappings may seem alarming but they must put into context.
The figures for the West Midlands were released under a Freedom of Information Act submitted by the charity Parents and Abducted Children Together Geoff Newiss, director of research at PACT, said: "These figures show the West Midlands is not immune from the problem of abduction.
An Abduction Revelation" is an intriguing adventure inspired by some true life experiences of the Author.
It's natural to conduct a thorough investigation if there's even the slightest possibility" of a connection to North Korea's abductions, Ota said at a news conference.
I am determined to achieve the return of all abductees, hunt for the truth of the abductions and secure the handover of abductors under my Cabinet," the prime minister said.
Senate for adopting Resolution 543 on International Parental Child Abduction, and shame on the two senators from Oregon for co-sponsoring it.
The North maintains the abduction cases have been resolved, but Japan has been seeking a reinvestigation into the abductions that took place in the 1970s and 1980s.
According to FBI studies, the majority of successfully resolved child abduction cases included a neighborhood canvass.
Shalaby, whose own daughter was abducted to Egypt, said that a large proportion of abductions were committed by parents who are unaware such action is illegal.
Jacobs specializes in the issue of child abduction - an issue of inter-country marriages in which one parent takes a child to their home country and abandons the other parent.
Masami Ito, Outside the 1980 Hague Convention: Japan Remains Safe Haven for Parental Abductions, JAPAN TIMES, Dec.
Coverage includes an overview of the topic, various types of abduction, secondary victims of childhood abductions, the psychological changes that often stop long-term abducted children from attempting to escape or seek help, police response to abduction, what government agencies can do to help prevent child abductions, and helping victims recover.