abdominal migraine


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Related to abdominal migraine: Abdominal epilepsy

ab·dom·i·nal mi·graine

1. migraine in children accompanied by paroxysmal abdominal pain. This must be distinguished from similar symptoms requiring surgical attention.
2. a disorder that causes intermittent abdominal pain and is believed to be related to migraine; abdominal migraine has some of the features of migraine, for example, there may be a strong family history of migraine headaches, and the condition may be relieved by sleep; however, a headache may not be present. The diagnosis depends on excluding other causes of abdominal pain.

abdominal migraine

Intermittent attacks of prolonged and intense upper abdominal pain, often associated with nausea or vomiting. The condition is considered a variant of migraine headache. Synonym: cyclic vomiting syndrome
See also: migraine

Abdominal migraine

Another term that is sometimes used for CVS.

ab·dom·i·nal mi·graine

(ab-domi-năl mīgrān)
1. Migraine in children accompanied by paroxysmal abdominal pain. This must be distinguished from similar symptoms requiring surgical attention.
2. Disorder that causes intermittent abdominal pain and is believed to be related to migraines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abdominal migraine and treatment with intravenous valproic acid.
Abdominal migraine is excluded, however, if any of the following are present: mild symptoms not interfering with daily activities, burning pain, non-midline abdominal pain, symptoms consistent with food allergy or other gastrointestinal disease, attacks lasting less than 1 hour or persistence of symptoms between attacks.
Despite its inclusion in both the IHS classification as well as inclusion in the 2006 Rome III GI Criteria (Gastroenterology 2006;130:1527-37), abdominal migraine is infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain in children.
Pizotifen (serotonergic agent) has been found to improve abdominal migraine symptoms in school-aged children, but has not been used with FAP (Symon & Russel, 1995).
According to the IHS (2004), cyclical vomiting and abdominal migraine are considered precursors of migraine in children because the clinical features of these two conditions resemble migraine symptoms.
He found that around four per cent of children, aged between five and 15, had recurrent attacks of abdominal pain, which could be called abdominal migraine.
Around 15% of children with recurrent abdominal pain actually suffer from abdominal migraines.
Of 458 who met inclusion criteria, 4% (20) met the IHS diagnostic criteria for abdominal migraine (see box), while another 11% (50) were considered probable diagnoses of abdominal migraine with documentation lacking for at least one diagnostic criterion.
They have proposed revised criteria for abdominal migraine that would include: pain as the predominant and consistent symptom; negative laboratory and radiographic testing; subsequent development of migraines or positive response to anti-migraine medication.
The causes of functional RAP include irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, abdominal migraine, aerophagia, and psychiatric disorders.
The criteria classify pediatric FGID into functional abdominal pain, functional dyspepsia, IBS, and abdominal migraine.
Functional disorders--which include irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, abdominal migraine, aerophagia, and idiopathic functional pain--were present in 24 children, division chief Dr.