abandonment


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Abandonment

Malpractice A physician's unilateral severance—or so-called "negligent termination"—of a professional relationship with a patient, such that the patient must seek care with another physician, either without the patient's consent, or without reasonable or adequate notification, and/or under circumstances in which the need remains for continuity of medical care for a particular condition.
Acts of abandonment Any denial of the physician-patient relationship; refusal, or—more commonly—alleged refusal to treat a patient that the doctor has previously seen; lack of attendance to a patient for whom the doctor has already assumed responsibility, either not visiting the patient while in the hospital, or not seeing the hospitalised patient as frequently as due care in treatment requires; failure to provide follow-up attention; and failure to arrange for a competent substitute in times of absence. 
Psychiatry Unilateral discontinuation of patient treatment by a clinician.
Social medicine The desertion of a child by a parent or adult caretaker with no provisions for reasonable child-care or apparent intention to return. A child may be considered abandoned if left alone or with siblings or non-related and unsuitable individuals; abandonment is considered a form of physical neglect.

abandonment

Malpractice A physician's unilateral severance–or 'negligent termination' of a professional relationship with a Pt–so that the Pt may continue care with another physician, either without the Pt's consent, or without reasonable or adequate notification, and/or under circumstances in which the need for continuing medical care remains. See Malpractice Social medicine The desertion of a child by a parent or adult caretaker with no provisions for reasonable child-care or apparent intention to return; a child may be considered abandoned if left alone or with siblings or nonrelated and unsuitable individuals; abandonment is considered a form of physical neglect.

abandonment

(ă-ban′dŏn-mĕnt) [Fr. abandoner, to surrender]
Premature termination of the professional treatment relationship by the health care provider without adequate notice or the patient's consent.

prescription abandonment

Leaving a prescription at a pharmacy, rather than purchasing it because of an oversight, the cost of the drug, or a concern about its potential side effects.

abandonment (of a patient),

n the withdrawing of a patient from treatment without giving reasonable notice or providing a competent replacement.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mortgagee's basis in property received through voluntary reconveyance, foreclosure or abandonment is the adjusted basis of the indebtedness for which the property served as security, determined as of the acquisition date, plus acquisition costs.
If the abandonment value is $110,000 in each case, the decisions are obvious: asset A should be abandoned; assets B and C should be retained.
5) In assessing an abandonment of premises, courts focus on three key factors: 1) Flight by the occupant to avoid apprehension; 2) the nature of the occupant's tenancy; and 3) the condition in which the premises are left upon departure.
Therefore, arson rates, reflecting one illegitimate method of abandonment, would also be expected to be high.
To keep today's shoppers engaged and buying, this data shows that retailers are going beyond a singular focus on shopping cart abandonment.
Mohamood: The power of cart abandonment emails is the clear buyer intent.
In order to address this issue, today Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued regulations to allow married victims of domestic abuse or spousal abandonment to claim a premium tax credit without filing a joint return for up to three consecutive years.
Either a flat fee to cover all runners or a fee based on mileage travelled, with a similar structure for jockeys, would go a long way towards enabling the racing community to work together and end the time-consuming process of individual negotiations between racing constituents for each abandonment.
In higher socioeconomic neighborhoods, for a number of reasons, it might be easier to hide an abandonment without anyone finding out,'' she said.
165(a) abandonment loss deductions in connection with the subsequent sale of the acquired branches.
Mimbres during the twelfth century: abandonment, continuity, and reorganization.
Watkins presents an interesting review of the topos of female abandonment in writers following from Virgil, from Ovid's oppositional recasting of the Dido story, through Augustine's rejection of the Aeneid, the positive moral allegorizations of Fulgentius and Bernard Silvestris, to Dante and Chaucer, and finally Ariosto and Tasso.