alpha-adrenergic receptors

(redirected from a-adrenergic receptors)

α-ad·re·ner·gic re·cep·tors

adrenergic receptors in effector tissues capable of selective activation and blockade by drugs; conceptually derived from the ability of certain agents, such as phenoxybenzamine, to block only some adrenergic receptors and of other agents, such as methoxamine, to activate only the same adrenergic receptors. Such receptors are designated as α-receptors. Their activation results in physiologic responses such as increased peripheral vascular resistance, mydriasis, and contraction of pilomotor muscles.

α-ad·re·ner·gic re·cep·tors

(adrĕ-nĕrjik rĕ-septŏrz)
Those in effector tissues capable of selective activation and blockade by drugs; conceptually derived from the ability of certain agents, such as phenoxybenzamine, to block only some adrenergic receptors and of other agents, such as methoxamine, to activate only the same adrenergic receptors. Such receptors are designated as α-receptors. Their activation results in physiologic responses such as increased peripheral vascular resistance, mydriasis, and contraction of pilomotor muscles.

α-adrenergic receptors

see adrenergic receptors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asenapine binds to several serotonergic, dopaminergic, and a-adrenergic receptors, but has almost no affinity for muscarinic cholinergic receptors, and so is assumed to cause fewer significant anticholinergic side effects, compared with other antipsychotic medications.