Patient discussion about vaccination

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. Do Vaccines cause Autism?

I have heard all over the news lately that the vaccines we give our children can cause Autism. Is this true? Is it dangerous? Should I vaccinate my one year old son?
A1NO

Andrew Wakefield MD started the controversy when publish the idea in Lancet. He was paid 130,000 dollars to lie

Check this link for full story:
http://www.thedoctorsvideos.com/video/749/MMR-and-Autism-The-Andrew-Wakefield-Story

A2yes, they do cause autism!

before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.
A3There is no proof that the MMR vaccine (or any other vaccine) causes Autism. Here is a video that discusses the issue and could interest you:
http://www.5min.com/Video/Vaccine-Safety-and-Autism-6114

Q. Who Should Receive the Flu Vaccine?

Should I go get vaccinated for the flu? I have been told it is advised only for certain people, so who should receive this vaccine?
A1before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links and create your own opinion:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.
A2In general, everyone can receive the flu vaccine. However, it is especially recommended for specific high risk patients such as chronically ill (for example- patients with diabetes mellitus), elderly patients or young children.
A3Vaccination against the influenza virus, which causes the flu, with the influenza vaccine, is often recommended for high-risk groups, such as children and the elderly.
http://www.5min.com/Video/Flu-Vaccine-9546

Q. Does the flu vaccine protect from all kinds of flu?

If I get a flu vaccine does that mean I am completely protected from getting the flu?
A1No, the vaccine does not give complete protection from all the flu types out there. The vaccine protects from the most common types of flu, which are: H3N2, H1N1 and one B virus.
A2Each vaccine contains three influenza viruses-one A (H3N2) virus, one A (H1N1) virus, and one B virus. The viruses in the vaccine change each year based on international surveillance and scientists' estimations about which types and strains of viruses will circulate in a given year. However, it is possible to catch other types of flu other from these.

Q. I there a connection between vaccines and autism?

My son is almost a year old and its time for his MMR vaccine. I am scared since I heard they might cause autism, is this true?
A1Here are a few movies about this issue:
http://www.5min.com/Video/Do-Vaccines-cause-Autism-7480877
http://www.5min.com/Video/Autism-and-Vaccine---Is-There-a-Link-4191283
A2There was a fear that the MMR vaccine can cause autism however after a lot of research and study the results were that it does not cause autism. The reason they thought the two were connected was because the vaccine occurs at the age of one years old and that about the same time when the symptoms of autism begin to surface.

Q. Do you know about Autism and Vaccinations?

Dr. Andrew Wakefield, a famous doctor for children at the Royal Free Hospital in London made in 1998 following report...
A1this is not true!!!! as you can check in this quote from the Cochrane library:
"Measles, mumps and rubella are three very dangerous infectious diseases which cause a heavy disease, disability and death burden in the developing world. Researchers from the Cochrane Vaccines Field reviewed 139 studies conducted to assess the effects of the live attenuated combined vaccine to prevent measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) in children. MMR protects children against infections of the upper airways but very rarely may cause a benign form of bleeding under the skin and milder forms of measles, mumps and rubella. NO CREDIBLE EVIDENCE of an involvement of MMR with either autism or Crohn's disease was found. No field studies of the vaccine's effectiveness were found but the impact of mass immunisation on the elimination of the diseases has been demonstrated worldwide."
A2In this time in 1998, 12 children get the MMR-vaccination (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) - what a cocktail! All 12 children had afterwards chronical enteritis. But this was not the top. 11 children of the 12 vaccinated ones, became autism !!!
Check it yourself out, if you can't believe me:
http://www.credencegroup.co.uk/Eclub/ses/sessearch.php?q=Dr.+Andrew+Wakefield&pvdc=0
Fasten your belt to get not more sick, please!

Q. Should I Vaccinate My Daughter Against HPV?

I have a 12 year old daughter. Her School wants all the girls aged 12 and up to be vaccinated against HPV. A lot of Parents are against this vaccine. I want to know more about this vaccine and if I should vaccinate my daughter.
A1before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.
A2I found this video which discusses this issue:
http://www.5min.com/Video/Should-I-Vaccinate-My-Daughter-Against-HPV-7272
A3The Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is a vaccine that targets certain sexually transmitted strains of human papillomavirus associated with the development of cervical cancer and genital warts. Two HPV vaccines are currently on the market: Gardasil and Cervarix. The vaccine, protects against four HPV types, which together cause 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. The vaccine is given through a series of three shots over a six-month period. HPV is a sexually transmitted infection, and ideally, the vaccine should be given to women before they become sexually active in order to ensure maximum benefit, therefore is recommended for 12 year olds.


Q. How do vaccines protect individuals from infectious diseases?

Is it a 100% protection? And how come there are diseases without a vaccine?
A1Vaccine is a part of a pathogen (sometime the pathogen itself without the harmful part in it) that we inject to our self in order to get the body “ready” to meet the real disease. Unfortunately not all of the bacteria and viruses have vaccines. Some of them we can not mimic their proteins safely enough, or it won’t work any way. And sometimes it’s only partly effective, the body remembers it but not too well. So some of the vaccines offer only a partial protection.
A2i don"t think that theres anything that covers 100%,but it will come close too it,and somthings nobody has found a cure for,thats why there isn"t anything there,
A3The best protection from outside threats is our own body defense system- the immunological system. When that fails – you are in bug trouble (like HIV). A part of that system is adaptive and can manufacture small protein that recognizes in high specificity foreign bodies. They recognize it and attach to it and then the body removes it with the urine. But it takes time. Vaccines are taking a part of those bacteria and injecting you. Then your body recognize it and the next time he’ll meet the bacteria- it’ll be ready for him. Not all the bacteria has s good vaccine material.
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