Patient discussion about spin

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Q. Is this Vertigo?

When I stand on high places and look down and feel very dizzy. Is this vertigo?
AVertigo is often confused with a fear of heights. However, the dizzy feeling when you look down from a high place is not the same as vertigo, which can occur at any time and may last for many years.
Vertigo is more severe than dizziness, which is often experienced as a feeling of light-headedness when you stand up. Vertigo can make moving around difficult, as the sensation of spinning affects your balance.

Q. What causes Vertigo?

My friend says she has vertigo and suffers from dizzy spells every now and then. Is this physiological or physical?
A1Vertigo is most commonly caused by a problem with the balancing mechanism in the inner ear. This is a coiled tube of fluid that lies behind the eardrum called the labyrinth. Viral infections such as a common cold or flu can spread to the labyrinth (labyrinthitis). Less commonly, labyrinthitis is caused by a bacterial infection of the middle ear (otitis media). Vertigo caused by an ear infection usually starts suddenly, and may be accompanied by a painful ear and high temperature.
Vertigo can also occur because of:
Arthritis in the neck, Migraines, Poor circulation, Motion sickness and over-breathing (hyperventilation), Alcohol and certain drugs.
A2Vertigo, or dizziness, is a symptom, not a disease. The term vertigo refers to the sensation of spinning or whirling that occurs as a result of a disturbance in balance (equilibrium). It also may be used to describe feelings of dizziness, lightheadedness, faintness, and unsteadiness. If your friend has been diagnosed with vertigo and is not just using the term vertigo to describe her dizziness, then this is a physical condition.

Q. What Is The Difference Between Dizziness and Vertigo?

I have really bad dizziness problems, and my doctor wrote down that I have "true vertigo". What is the difference between vertigo and dizziness?
A1Vertigo is a term that means there is a feeling as if in a spin. Dizziness describes any lack of stableness, not necessarily a true spinning sensation. There are two types of vertigo: subjective and objective. Subjective vertigo is when a person feels a false sensation of movement. Objective vertigo is when the surroundings will appear to move past a person's field of vision.
A2Vertigo, a specific type of dizziness, is a major symptom of a balance disorder. It is the sensation of spinning or swaying while the body is stationary with respect to the earth or surroundings. The effects of vertigo may be slight. It can cause nausea and vomiting and, if severe, may give rise to difficulty with standing and walking. Therefore when doctors ask whether or not you feel like "you are spinning", or "is the world spinning", they are trying to distinguish between the two, because the diagnosis is different with or without that spinning sensation.

Q. Dizziness and vomiting after a car accident, what can it be?

Two days ago I was in a car accident and a car rear ended me. I went to the emergency room and was checked up and was discharged saying all is ok. Following the next morning I woke up and the whole room was spinning. I feel nauseous and find it hard to do daily activities. What do I have?
A1It could be Vertigo. The sudden onset of vertigo usually indicates a peripheral vestibular disorder.
Symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) usually last a few seconds to a few minutes and are intermittent (i.e., come and go). They also may include lightheadedness, imbalance, and nausea, usually as a result of a change in position (e.g., rolling over in bed, getting out of bed). Please consult your GP about these symptoms.
A2It sounds like Vertigo, which can happen from car accidents. Symptoms of vertigo vary in severity and may include the following:
A feeling your surroundings are moving or spinning, nausea, vomiting, difficulty in standing or walking, the sensation of light-headedness, the sensation of not being able to keep up with what you are looking at, and the sensation that the floor is moving.
Go to your GP for further diagnosis. He might do an examination of your ears, eye movements and nervous system in order to find out the cause of your symptoms.
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