Patient discussion about cystic fibrosis

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. Can cystic fibrosis patients have children?

My boyfriend has cystic fibrosis, and currently he’s treated with many medications but usually healthy (other than pneumonia from hospitalization from time to time). I heard that men with cystic fibrosis can’t have children - is that true? Is there anything he can do about it?
A1WE ARE A HEALTHY COUPLE BUT MY WIFE NEVER GET PREGNANT IN 20 YEARS OF RELATIONSHIP.
I'M SO SORRY ABOUT MY ENGLISH, I'M LEARNING.
A2In addition to the answer above, it’s nowadays possible for cystic fibrosis men to have children with special fertility treatments (try google MESA and ICSI).
A3While 95% of cystic fibrosis men are indeed infertile, it’s nowadays possible for to have children with special fertility treatments.

Q. Do women with cystic fibrosis have difficult pregnancy?

My wife has cystic fibrosis, and after 3 year of marriage we decided we want a baby. I know that men with cystic fibrosis are usually infertile and can’t have children- is that the case also for women with cystic fibrosis? Is the pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis more problematic? Is it dangerous?
A1Before you attempt a pregnancy, you should consult her doctor to make sure she can tolerate it, because very severe disease can make the pregnancy dangerous for her. If her disease isn’t so severe, usually there are no special problems.
A2If your wife’s disease isn’t severe, and her lungs are functioning fairly well, she can have normal pregnancy. The important thing is to treat the disease intensively to improve the chances of the pregnancy.
A3Women with cystic fibrosis has also problems with fertility, although the chances are much less than in men, only about 20%, and sometimes these problems are reversible and can be treated.
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.