Zen

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Related to Zen Buddhism: Tibetan Buddhism, Taoism

Zen

A form of meditation that emphasizes direct experience.
Mentioned in: Pilates
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this is not entirely in accord with the telos of Zen Buddhism.
10) The point is thus that, as critics such as Faure, Robert Sharf (1995), and David McMahan (2008) have noted, we need to understand that Suzuki's writings developed in a very specific intellectual context that combined attempts to modernize Zen Buddhism and present it as something uniquely Japanese, while at the same time showing how it spoke to the general turmoil of the modern world.
The monks of Athos in their practice of the vision of the divine light do not repeat an enigmatic word as in Zen Buddhism but, rather, "the prayer of Jesus": Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.
Zen Buddhism, Somaesthetics, Cross-cultural understanding and interpretation, translation, non-duality.
The subject of this book is Zen Master Dogen ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 1200-1253), founder of the Soto school of Zen Buddhism and arguably one of the greatest thinkers in the history of Japan.
Daruma dolls, representing the Indian priest Bodhidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism in China, is used to bring luck.
To wrap up the festival, Kay Larson, author of Where the Heart Beats: John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists will be in residence from November 13-15.
All this and more is going on as her true love, Jaimy Fletcher, is in Burma studying Zen Buddhism.
RAIL: What I found curious was how differently Zen Buddhism affected American artists, as opposed to Asian artists.
Zen Buddhism was a primary influence in the development of the tea ceremony.
Stable government, Sumo wrestling, the tea ceremony, Kabuki theater, Zen Buddhism, sushi, and other aspects of modern Japanese culture are traced to the Tokuwaga period (1600-1868).
From this she devised dolls in honor of Daruma, the legendary Father of Zen Buddhism, enshrined in history for bringing Buddhist teachings from India to Japan.