Yersinia

(redirected from Yersinia ruckeri)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Yersinia ruckeri: Yersinia pestis, Yersinia kristensenii

Yersinia

 [yer-sin´e-ah]
a genus of nonmotile, ovoid or rod-shaped, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae). Y. pes´tis causes plague in humans and rodents; it is transmitted from rat to rat and from rat to human by the rat flea, and between humans by the human body louse. Y. enterocoli´tica causes acute gastroenteritis and mesenteric lymphadenitis, especially in young children, and arthritis, septicemia, and erythema nodosum in adults. Y. pseudotuberculo´sis causes disease in rodents and mesenteric lymphadenitis in humans.

Yersinia

(yer-sin'ē-ă),
A genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells; Yersinia are nonmotile at 37°C, but some species are motile at temperatures below 30°C; motile cells are peritrichous; citrate is not used as a sole source of carbon; these organisms are parasitic on humans and other animals; the type species is Yersinia pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]

Yersinia

/Yer·sin·ia/ (yer-sin´e-ah) a genus of nonmotile, ovoid or rod-shaped, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae); Y. enterocoli´tica is a ubiquitous species that causes acute gastroenteritis and mesenteric lymphadenitis in children and arthritis, septicemia, and erythema nodosum in adults; Y. pes´tis causes plague in humans and rodents, transmitted from rats to humans by the rat flea, and from person to person by the human body louse; Y. pseudotuberculo´sis causes disease in rodents and mesenteric lymphadenitis in humans.

yersinia

(yər-sĭn′ē-ə)
n. pl. yersin·iae (-ē-ē′)
A gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia that causes various diseases in animals and humans, including plague.

Yersinia

[yersin′ē·ə]
Etymology: Alexandre E.J. Yersin, French bacteriologist, 1862-1943
a genus of nonmotile ovoid or rod-shaped gram-negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family.

Yersinia

A genus of pathogenic gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccobacillary bacteria, which cause bubonic plague–Y pestis, intestinal infections–Y enterocolitica, mesenteric lymphadenitis–Y pseudotuberculosis, which mimics appendicitis

Yer·sin·i·a

(yĕr-sin'ē-ă)
A genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells. These organisms are parasitic on humans and other animals. The type species is Yersinia pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]

Yersinia

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE rod-shaped organisms that includes the bacillus Y. pestis responsible for PLAGUE. Formerly classified as Pasteurella , Yersinia have been reclassified as Enterobacteriaceae and the genus renamed. Louis Pasteur, although nominal head of the Institute, was not entitled to the credit or the discovery of the plague bacillus. (Alexandre Émile Jean Yersin, 1862–1943, French bacteriologist, working in Hong Kong.)

Yer·sin·i·a

(yĕr-sin'ē-ă)
Genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells; parasitic on humans and other animals; type species is Y. pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]

Yersinia

a genus of ovoid or rod-shaped, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae.

Yersinia enterocolitica
often carried by many animal species, especially pigs, and associated with sporadic diarrhea in humans and animals. Farmed deer are highly susceptible.
Yersinia pestis
causes bubonic plague in humans and sylvatic plague in rodents and cats.
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
causes yersiniosis in laboratory animals, wild rodents and domestic species, including cattle, sheep and cats. See also pyemic hepatitis.
Yersinia ruckeri
causes enteric redmouth and salmonid blood spot disease especially of Atlantic salmon fry and parr.
Yersinia tularensis
see francisellatularensis.