Yergason test

Yer·ga·son test

(yĕr'gă-sŏn test)
Maneuver to diagnose bicipital tendinitis. With the elbow flexed at 90 degrees, and while the forearm is pronated, the patient supinates the forearm, flexes the elbow, and externally rotates the humerus while the examiner resists these movements and applies downward traction to the elbow. The test result is positive if it elicits pain over the bicipital groove or if the tendon snaps out of the groove.

Yergason test

(yĕr′gă-sŏnz)
[Robert Mosley Yergason, 20th-cent. U.S. physician]
A test used to identify subluxation of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle from the bicipital groove caused by disruption of the transverse humeral ligament. The patient is seated, the glenohumeral joint is in the anatomical position, the elbow flexed to 90 degrees, and the forearm supinated to assume the “palm up” position. The evaluator resists the patient as the shoulder is externally rotated and the elbow flexed. A positive test result is marked by a “snapping” sensation as the long head of the biceps brachii subluxates from the bicipital groove, indicating a tear of the transverse humeral ligament.