Yalow


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Yalow

 [yal´o]
Rosalyn. Medical physicist who developed the radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique and was awarded the Nobel prize in medicine or physiology in 1977. An enthusiastic supporter of women in science careers, she noted “We must believe in ourselves or no one else will believe in us...we must feel a personal responsibility to ease the path for those who come after us. The world cannot afford the loss of the talents of half of its people if we are to solve the many problems that beset us.”
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Yalow was the first physics major to graduate from Hunter College in 1941, at the age of 19 (and before the nuclear bomb had been invented); she had heard Enrico Fermi lecture on the first experiments in nuclear fission.
Then it was a summer of work on a survey crew and on to graduate school at Urbana Illinois where he recalls one of his classmates was Rosalyn Yalow (nee Sussman) a future Nobel Prize winner.
This all changed in 1969 when Berson and Yalow discovered that it was possible to generate highly-specific antibodies to hormones.
Rosalyn Yalow, in a paper accepted for publication in March 1960, described a new accurate and elegant methodology "Immunoassay of endogenous plasma insulin in man".
Reasonable, perhaps, one might think, unless one were Solomon Berson and Roselyn Yalow, whose work on immunoassay (which was to receive a Nobel prize in 1977) was rejected by the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Yalow was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine for this achievement after Dr.
Otra investigadora que obtuvo el premio Nobel de Fisiologia y Medicina en 1977 fue la biofisica estadounidense Rosalyn Yalow, por sus trabajos junto con el doctor Solomon Beron en el desarrollo del radioinmunoensayo de las hormonas peptidicas, que permiten analizar quimicamente los tejidos y sangre humanos para diagnosticar ciertas enfermedades como la diabetes.
For example, discovery-oriented or constructivist approaches to learning generally succeed better than more didactic approaches with more able learners (Cronbach & Snow, 1977; Snow & Yalow, 1982).
Beginning with the 1977 award to Rosalyn Sussman Yalow for radioimmunoassay in investigative medicine, however, four women have received Nobel Prizes.
In 1954, Berson and Yalow (46) postulated that following initial clearance of an administered dose of radioiodine, the major portion of the radioiodine in the body is distributed between two compartments, the thyroidal and extrathyroidal organic I pools, which are in dynamic equilibrium.
Requiring high scores for passing may prevent many potentially good teachers from entering education, but setting low scores for passing may create a negative attitude toward teaching because of the large numbers of individuals who would be certified (Popham & Yalow, 1984).
Some of these results derive from research by Elanna Yalow, Individual Differences in Learning from Verbal and Figural Materials (Stanford.