xenotransplantation

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Related to Xenotransplants: xenograft, xenotransplantation

xenotransplantation

(zĕn′ə-trăns′plăn-tā′shən, zē′nə-)
n.
The surgical transfer of cells, tissues, or especially whole organs from an organism of one species to an organism of a different species.
The transplantation of an organ from a lower mammal—e.g., baboon, pig—to a higher mammal—e.g., human

xenotransplantation

Xenogeneic transplantation Transplant biology The transplantation of cells or tissues from one species to another; the use of live, nonhuman animal cells, tissues, and organs in humans. See Xenograft.

xenotransplantation

Transplantation of organs from animals, usually transgenic animals, especially pigs, specifically engineered for the purpose. Until recently, no transplanted pig organ had survived for more than a month. But advances in the development of new immunosuppressive agents against xenografts and the identification of the main target for human xenoreactive (anti-pig) antibodies have extended this period to an average of 76 days. Precautions can also be taken against virus transmission. The future for xenotransplantation seems bright.

xenotransplantation

the transplantation of an organ or tissue from an animal of one species to an animal of a different species.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have seen that consent of an individual to a xenotransplant has significant bearing on the protection of society (7).
produce human proteins, (153) and to create xenotransplant animal donors
The perceived benefits to individual recipients are obvious, as individuals on waiting lists for non-existent human organs could be treated instead with xenotransplants.
Offering a broad ethical underpinning for xenotransplant research, the document said human beings have a right to use animals to achieve true human progress, but also a responsibility to treat them decently.
One fear that arises with xenotransplants is that if we begin animal-to-human transplants too quickly there is a remote but real danger that animal viruses might jump to humans and cause manmade outbreaks of disease (xenozoonosis).
Vanderpool (1998b) cautioned that if these issues are not attended to, clinical trials with xenotransplants could erode the arduous efforts to secure the rights of research subjects and maintain the public's trust in medical research.
The vast majority of patients who receive xenotransplants die quite quickly - without ever being able to live normal lives.
Should it be the case, it raises huge implications for scientists today as they develop generic engineering or the use of animal organs for human transplants, known as xenotransplants.
baboon to human), such xenotransplants are referred to as "concordant.
Declan Butler, "Poll Reveals Backing for Xenotransplants," Nature 391 (1998): 315.
Dr Paul Heerling is head of research at the pharmaceutical company Novartis, which is developing xenotransplants - the name given to animal organs implanted into humans.
Xenotransplants, as such cross-species operations are known, could be commonplace a decade from now, they say.