Wuchereria bancrofti


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Wu·cher·e·ri·a ban·croft·i

the bancroftian filaria, a species endemic in the South Pacific islands, coastal China, India, and Myanmar, and throughout tropical Africa and northeastern South America (including certain Caribbean islands). Transmitted to humans (apparently the only definitive host) by mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes pseudoscutellaris, but also by several other species of Culex, Aedes, Anopheles, and Mansonia, depending on the specific geographic area. Adults are white, 40-100 mm, cylindric, threadlike worms, and the microfilariae are ensheathed, with a rounded anterior end and a tapered, nonnucleated tail; the adult worms inhabit the larger lymphatic vessels (for example, in the lower extremities, breasts, spermatic cord, and retroperitoneal tissues) and the sinuses of lymph nodes (for example, the popliteal, femoral, and inguinal groups, as well as the epitrochlear and axillary nodes), where they sometimes temporarily obstruct the flow of lymph and cause slight to moderate inflammation.

Wu·cher·e·ri·a ban·crof·ti

(vū-kĕr-ē'rē-ă ban-krof'tī)
The bancroftian filaria, transmitted to humans (apparently the only definitive host) by mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes pseudoscutellaris, but also by several other species of Culex, Aedes, Anopheles, and Mansonia, depending on the specific geographic area; adults are white, threadlike worms, and the microfilariae are ensheathed, with rounded anterior end and tapered, nonnucleated tail; the adult worms inhabit the larger lymphatic vessels (e.g., in the extremities, breasts, spermatic cord, and retroperitoneal tissues) and the sinuses of lymph nodes, where they sometimes cause temporary obstruction of lymph flow and slight or moderate inflammation.

Wuchereria bancrofti

A parasitic worm that is the causative agent of elephantiasis. Adults of the species live in human lymph nodes and ducts. Females give birth to sheathed microfilariae, which remain in internal organs during the day but at night are in circulating blood, where they are sucked up by night-biting mosquitoes, in which they continue their development, becoming infective larvae in about 2 weeks. They are then passed on to humans when the mosquito bites.
Synonym: Filaria bancrofti
See also: Wuchereria

Wucherer,

Otto, German physician, 1820-1873.
Wuchereria bancrofti - the bancroftian filaria.
Wuchereria - genus of filarial nematodes.
wuchereriasis - infection with worms of the genus Wuchereria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rajagopalan PK, Geetha Bai M and Arunachalam N (1981): Age-determination of man-biting population of Culex pipiens fatigans with particular reference to transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in Pondicherry.
Wuchereria bancrofti is the major species accounting for >98% of filarial cases in India.
Diethylcarbam azine medicated salt in the chemotherapeutic control of filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti in an open community.
There seemed to be a relatively lower microfilaraemia intensity among women of reproductive age as has been reported for Wuchereria bancrofti (24,27).
The effect of a low dose of ivermectin on the emergence of Wuchereria bancrofti in diurnal blood.
Laboratory investigation of the infection rates of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus in the transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti.
In an experimental study on Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera : Culicidae), it was noted that both temperature and relative humidity play a very important role in the transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in man (1).
Lymphatic filariasis, a disease caused by filarial parasites, Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori, is a major health problem with nearly 1.
The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus act as a vector for Wuchereria bancrofti responsible for filariasis in India.
Molecular tools (PCR assays) have been developed earlier for the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti (9-11), Brugia malayi (12-14) and Onchocerca volvulus (15,16).
Transmission dynamics of Wuchereria bancrofti in East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea.
A total of 2585 night blood samples were collected from the study area of which 90 persons were found positive for mf belonging to species Wuchereria bancrofti.