Wonderlic Personnel Test


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Wonderlic Personnel Test

Psychology A brief psychological test which assesses a person's ability to learn and grasp principles and apply them in new settings

Wonderlic Personnel Test

(wŏn′dĕr-lik)
[Eldon F. Wonderlic, 20th-cent. U.S. industrial psychologist]
,

WPT

An intelligence test to determine the suitability of a job applicant for employment and on-the-job training. It consists of 50 questions, arranged from the simplest to the most difficult. It is used in many applications, esp. in the National Football League (NFL) as a gauge of numerical, verbal, and logical ability of the applicant and the ability to solve problems quickly.
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In 1996, Robert Jordan, a 46 year-old insurance salesman, completed the Wonderlic Personnel Test as part of the application process for a police patrolman position in New London.
Two of these people agreed to take the Wonderlic Personnel Test and to fill out the questionnaire at a later time.
The 10-minute test by Wonderlic Personnel Test, a personality profiling firm in Northfield, Ill.
Christians and Malaysian Muslims"; "The Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men: The Role of Decision Confidence in Outcome Success"; "Disposition toward Thinking Critically: A Comparison of Preservice Teachers and Other University Students"; "An Interview with Robert Sternberg about Learning Disabilities";"Interdisciplinarity and the Cross-Training of Clinical Psychologists: Preparing Graduates for Hybrid Careers"; "Validity Comparison of the General Ability Measure for Adults with the Wonderlic Personnel Test.
Finally, all trainees completed a measure of cognitive ability, the Wonderlic Personnel Test, in order to assess and to control for differences among trainees in their cognitive ability.
13) Numerous intelligence and personality tests can be used, but the Wonderlic Personnel test, which tests spelling, grammar, and math, is perhaps the most effective and efficient for small private security agencies.
In addition, Frisch and Jessop (1989) conducted a study that assessed the capability of the Shipley and Wonderlic Personnel Test in predicting Full Scale WAIS-R IQ scores using a sample of 34 male psychiatric inpatients.