will

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Related to Wills: Living Wills

will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.

will

(wil),
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

Etymology: AS, wyllan
1 the mental faculty that enables one to consciously choose or decide on a course of action.
2 the act or process of exercising the power of choice.
3 a wish, desire, or deliberate intention.
4 a disposition or attitude toward another or others.
5 determination or purpose; willfulness.
6 (in law) an expression or declaration of a person's wishes as to the disposition of property to be performed or take effect after death. Also called volition.

will

Forensics
“The legal expression or declaration of a person’s mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death”.

Medspeak-UK
A document which sets out who is to benefit from an individual’s property and possessions (estate) after his or her death. It also ensures that the estate is passed as intended, after taxes and debts have been paid.

Vox populi
Desire or volition (as in the “will to live”).

will

1. Desire, volition, as in the 'will to live', see there.
2. 'The legal expression or declaration of a person's mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death'. See Advance directive, Living will.

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will,

n a legal document detailing one's wishes in the disposal of one's body and property and the care of one's minor children and dependents.
will, living,
n a document that details one's wishes regarding the degree and amount of health care desired if one becomes mentally incapacitated.
References in classic literature ?
I can't go till my apple is done; besides, it is n't nine yet, and Will is going to take me along, when he goes.
She had so much of it at home, she got used to it," put in Will, pulling the little curl behind Polly's ear.
I told Tom about the bad fellow who blew up the professor, and he said he knew him, slightly; and I was so relieved, because I had a kind of a feeling that it was Tom himself, you and Will laughed so about it.
He looked perfectly bowed down with remorse last time I saw him," said Will, regarding Tom with eyes full of fun, for Will was a boy as well as a bookworm, and relished a joke as well as scatter-brained Tom.
I hope he 'll remember that his friends will be very much disappointed if he is.
Taking advantage of the moment while Will was wrestling with his boots in the closet, and Maud was absorbed in packing her apple into a large basket, Polly said to Tom in a low tone, "Thank you very much, for being so kind to Will.
You know I 've lost one brother, and Will takes Jimmy's place to me now.
The tears in Polly's eyes as she said that made Tom vow a tremendous vow within himself to stand by Will through thick and thin, and "keep him straight for Polly's sake"; feeling all the time how ill-fitted he was for such a task.
It was rather a silent drive, for Will obediently kept his muffler up, and Tom fell into a brown study.
Neither Polly nor Will tried to do anything of the sort, and that was the charm of it.
In order to help law students master wills and trusts law and pass examinations, Mennell and Burr summarize the basic legal knowledge but do not teach how to draft wills, trusts, or other documents.
Summary: British nationals were the largest group creating wills two years ago, with recent figures showing Indians in first place in 2017