Wilde


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Wilde

(wīld),
Sir William R.W., Irish oculist and otologist, 1815-1876. See: Wilde cords, Wilde triangle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lady Wilde has mainly gone down in history as the source of the terrible advice to Oscar, in the midst of his 1895 prosecution on the charge of "gross indecency" with men, not to flee to France and instead to stand trial before the hostile English court that would eventually convict him and condemn him to a prison sentence.
The Pearl District store is 1,800 square feet, Wilde said.
The Huddersfield court heard that Wilde, 42, went to Ramsdens pawnbrokers in the Packhorse Shopping Centre.
How Wilde actually goes about conceiving of this solace, how he constructs a multi-step plan for coming to terms with the events of his life and moving past his current suffering--these revelations of his letter have largely remained "hidden in plain sight," neglected perhaps because they evoke for us a somewhat unfamiliar, unexpected Wilde: a person of spiri tual thoughtfulness and maturity, unadorned with his customary wit and biting irony, and grappling with life's great spiritual questions.
At present, Wilde Automotive comprises 12 dealerships in Florida and Wisconsin, with above 700 employees.
Like many of his contemporaries, Wilde continued to perform in nostalgia tours in the UK and beyond.
Wilde Plumbing has been offering quality plumbing service in Waukesha and the surrounding region for more than 50 years.
Wilde will be seen next in "The Lazarus Effect," an American horror film directed by David Gelb.
Despite the flash, Friedman reminds us that Wilde was a highly intelligent, talented artist and critic, in many ways ahead of his time.
Egged on by his lover (and Queensberry's son) Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde took legal action against the Marquis who was arrested for criminal libel.
Her study regularly balances a tricky rhetorical line: she is able to present overviews of biographical details, texts and contexts detailed enough for the reader unfamiliar with Wilde's life, but brief enough so as to avoid seeming tedious to Wilde scholars.
When Salome was infamously banned by the censor before its planned summer 1892 London premiere, however, Wilde was forced to change plans: this performance text had to be rethought and remarketed as a book for reading audiences.