Wilde


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Wilde

(wīld),
Sir William R.W., Irish oculist and otologist, 1815-1876. See: Wilde cords, Wilde triangle.
References in periodicals archive ?
So what happened during the trials and what did Wilde say?
Essentially, Salamensky argues that Wilde went to great lengths to render the "textual body" distinct from the "material body," a separation that, as she points out in her critique of the 2011 Brian Bedford production of Earnest, can be quite difficult to stage.
Overall, Anne Markey's book is a very valuable addition to the growing field of Wilde criticism.
Wilde finds the human phenomenon of imitation to be rooted in desire.
Wilde had an opportunity to double Chester's advantage near the end of the contest, but he drove his effort straight at Kennedy who saved with his legs.
But Wilde was almost immediately cast herself, popping up in shows like The OC on Fox and landing a continuing supporting role on that network's hit series House as a self-destructive doctor.
Marley narrates and portrays Wilde as well as a variety of Wilde's friends, acquaintances, and family members.
In the letters, Wilde continually invited the magazine editor to visit him.
The order was made by West Bromwich Magistrates, said Miss Jones, but Wilde breached it by banging on her front door and also threatening to bomb her house.
Oscar Wilde might seem an unusual hero for a mystery.
Hucknall and fellow band-mate Chris DeMargary took John Wilde to court to stop him interfering with their hunting rights in Glenfin, in the shadow of Donegal's spectacular Blue Stack Mountains.
The model Oscar Wilde used for Dorian Gray later became a Catholic and a parish priest in Scotland.