charcoal

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charcoal

 [chahr´kōl]
carbon prepared by charring wood or other organic material.
activated charcoal the residue of destructive distillation of various organic materials, treated to increase its adsorptive power; used as a general purpose antidote.

char·coal

(char'kōl),
Carbon obtained by heating or burning wood with restricted access of air.
Synonym(s): carbo

charcoal

/char·coal/ (chahr´kōl) carbon prepared by charring wood or other organic material.
activated charcoal  residue of destructive distillation of various organic materials, treated to increase its adsorptive power; used as a general-purpose antidote.
animal charcoal  charcoal prepared from bone; it may be purified (purified animal c.) by removal of materials dissolved by hot hydrochloric acid and water; adsorbent and decolorizer.

charcoal

charcoal

(1) Activated charcoal.  
(2) Carbo veg; Carbo vegitabilis.

char·coal

(chahr'kōl)
Carbon obtained by heating or burning wood with restricted access of air.

charcoal

A black substance formed by heating wood in an atmosphere of restricted oxygen. Charcoal is a powerful adsorber of gases and of fine particulate matter and can be used as an antidote to various poisons, a deodorant, a filter and a remover of intestinal gas. Activated charcoal has been treated to increased its adsorptive properties. It is on the WHO official list.

char·coal

(chahr'kōl)
Carbon obtained by heating or burning wood with restricted access of air.

charcoal,

n a carbonized reduction of wood used as fuel and as an adsorptive substance to cleanse the air; it is used in some medical products.

charcoal

carbon prepared by charring wood or other organic material.

activated charcoal
the residue of destructive distillation of various organic materials, treated to increase its adsorptive power; used as a general purpose antidote.