West Nile fever


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Related to West Nile fever: West Nile encephalitis

West Nile fe·ver

febrile illness caused by West Nile virus (q.v.).

West Nile fever

See West Nile encephalitis.

West Nile fever

West Nile meningoencephalitis Infectious disease An acute, mosquito-borne flaviviral infection endemic–rarely, epidemic–in the Near East, Africa, former Soviet Union, India Clinical After a 3-6 day incubation, children present with a nonspecific febrile illness; older Pts develop a mild dengue-like disease with fever, rash that clears without desquamation, frontal headaches, orbital pain, backaches, myalgia, anorexia, lymphadenopathy, leukopenia, sore throat and possibly meningoencephalitis in the elderly; usually it is self-limited, and resolves in a wk. See Dengue fever.

West Nile fe·ver

(west nīl fē'vĕr)
Infection by West Nile virus, which is spread by mosquitoes. In mild infections, fever, headache, and muscle ache may last a few days. In severe infections, encephalitis, hyperpyrexia, stiff neck, convulsions, paralysis, and coma may last several weeks; resulting deficits may become permanent.

West Nile fever

A flavivirus arthropod-borne (arboviral) infection endemic mainly in birds and spread by culicine mosquitoes. The disease causes a feverish illness mainly affecting young children. There is headache muscle pain, enlarged lymph nodes and a rash of slightly raised spots. Widespread epidemics in the USA in 2002-the first reported in the Western hemisphere-featured a high percentage of cases of encephalitis, especially in elderly patients, with a mortality of about 9 per cent. New features were noted, including a poliomyelitis-like involvement of anterior horn cells with muscle paralysis.

West Nile,

a province in Uganda where the virus was first discovered in 1937.
West Nile encephalitis virus - a Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. Synonym(s): West Nile virus
West Nile fever - a febrile illness caused by West Nile virus, a member of the family Flaviviridae, and characterized by headache, fever, maculopapular rash, myalgia, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia; spread by Culex mosquitoes.
West Nile virus - Synonym(s): West Nile encephalitis virus
References in periodicals archive ?
After the human cases were confirmed, control measures, such as inclusion of West Nile fever in the differential diagnosis of neurologic diseases and the control of blood samples from suspected cases and donors, were implemented.
AIDS, Ebola, Mad Cow Disease, and West Nile Fever are only a few examples of the multitudes of new diseases for which there is no cure.
Clinical characteristics and functional outcomes of West Nile fever.
About 20 percent get West Nile fever and one in 150 gets encephalitis or meningitis,'' Mascola said.
cases of West Nile fever were reported in 1999 in New York.
Risk factors independently associated with developing neuroinvasive disease rather than West Nile fever included older age, male sex, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus.
Last year, the CDC confirmed nearly 10,000 cases of West Nile fever nationwide, with 264 deaths.
Nearly 80% of infected persons never develop symptoms, and almost 20% experience only a mild febrile illness, known as West Nile fever.
The concealed enemy is the deadly virus that causes West Nile fever, which first emerged in New York in 1999.
West Nile fever has become the dominant vectorborne viral disease in the United States, with >20,000 reported human cases, 770 deaths, and an estimated 215,000 illnesses during the past 7 years (3).
Of the 54 PVDs, 11 persons (median age: 50 years [range: 17-77 years]) subsequently had West Nile fever.
There may be the equivalent of West Nile fever in children, but we're really just beginning to look for it now," said Dr.

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